Dispatchers

(NOC 1525)

in All Business, Finance, and Administration

Dispatchers use radios and other telecommunication equipment to dispatch emergency vehicles and to coordinate the activities of drivers and other personnel. They work for police, fire and health departments, other emergency service agencies, taxi, delivery and courier services, trucking and utilities companies, and other commercial and industrial companies.

Job Outlook

Average

Read more

  • Estimate Stable employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 50 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate Moderate rate of unemployment in 2019

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

  • Estimate -1305 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4210 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a moderate sized occupation in Nova Scotia so some job opportunities may occur through turnover. The number employed in this occupation is expected to remain largely the same over the next few years. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Dispatchers most commonly work full-time hours.

The median employment income for 67% of Dispatchers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $45,474. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$12.95

Minimum

$19.90

Median

$28.85

Maximum

Annual Pay

$12,675

Minimum

$40,464

Median

$76,108

Maximum

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

Hourly Pay

$14.00

Minimum

$27.85

Median

$38.46

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,754

Minimum

$36,515

Median

$70,271

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Dispatchers use radios and other telecommunication equipment to dispatch emergency vehicles and to coordinate the activities of drivers and other personnel. They work for police, fire and health departments, other emergency service agencies, taxi, delivery and courier services, trucking and utilities companies, and other commercial and industrial companies.

Job duties

Dispatchers:

  • Receive requests for emergency assistance or service and contact ambulances, police and fire departments, tow-trucks, and utility crews.
  • Process and transmit information and instructions to coordinate the activities of vehicle operators, crews and equipment using computer-aided communications and dispatching equipment.
  • Dispatch workers according to written schedules and work orders, or as necessary by emergency situations.
  • Advise vehicle operators of route and traffic problems like construction, accidents, congestion, weather conditions, weight and size restrictions and other information.
  • Use radio equipment to communicate with ships, aircraft, mining crews, offshore oil rigs, logging camps and other remote operations.
  • Monitor personnel workloads and locations.
  • Maintain vehicle operator work records and make sure time sheets and payroll summaries are accurately completed.
  • Maintain records of mileage, fuel use, repairs, and other expenses and generate reports.

Sample job titles

  • 911 dispatcher
  • alarm system dispatcher
  • emergency medical dispatcher
  • mail service dispatcher
  • maintenance services dispatcher
  • motor vehicle dispatcher
  • police department dispatcher
  • radio operator
  • utilities maintenance crew dispatcher
  • yard clerk

Skills

You must be organized and pay attention to detail. Your work must be accurate. Good communication skills are important. You need to be able to work as part of a team. Computer skills and the ability to work with technology may be helpful. Emergency dispatchers must be able to work in a high-stress environment.

Job requirements

  • High school is required.
  • Police and emergency dispatchers need to complete formal on-the-job training. Other dispatchers usually complete some informal on-the-job training.
  • Police and emergency dispatchers and other radio operators usually need provincial radio operator's certificates.

Other considerations

None

By the numbers

Quick look

875

employed in 2016

89.1%

employed full-time

1.7%

self employed

57.1%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
42.9%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
44

median age

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

63,775

employed in 2016

78.4%

employed full-time

6.6%

self employed

73.4%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
26.6%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
47.9

median age

Where will I likely work?

52.9%

Halifax

17.2%

North Shore

12.1%

Annapolis Valley

9.2%

Southern

8.6%

Cape Breton

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

32.9%

Public administration

30.3%

Transportation and warehousing

7.1%

Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services

7.1%

Health care and social assistance

5.8%

Retail trade

What is the age of Employment?

27.0%

35-44

23.0%

45-54

20.0%

55-64

19.0%

25-34

6.0%

15-24

5.0%

65+

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

26.3%

45-54

22.6%

55-64

19.4%

35-44

16.7%

25-34

7.5%

65+

Top levels of education

33.7%

High school

$35,513 median annual income
30.9%

College Diploma

$40,691 median annual income
16.6%

Bachelor

$47,993 median annual income
9.1%

Less than high school

$44,665 median annual income
5.1%

Apprenticeship

$53,292 median annual income

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

33.8%

College Diploma

$36,304 median annual income
23.8%

High school

$32,903 median annual income
22.8%

Bachelor

$41,755 median annual income
5.8%

Apprenticeship

$34,807 median annual income
4.9%

Less than high school

$23,174 median annual income

Education & training

Adult high school/secondary diploma programs

This program is typically offered at the high school level.

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Siège Social: 1695, Route 1

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS B0W 1M0

(902) 769-2114

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

PO Box 220

Halifax, NS B3J 2M4

(866) 679-6722

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Trucking Human Resource Sector Council Atlantic
14 Court Street, Suite 301
Truro, NS B2N 5V2
Tel: (902) 893-8410
Fax: (902) 895-6984

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.

Job postings

There are currently no job postings for this occupation.