Court Reporters, Medical Transcriptionists, and Related Workers

(NOC 1251)

in All Business, Finance, and Administration

Court reporters record and transcribe the proceedings of courts, legislative assemblies and committees, and prepare transcripts for use by judges, tribunals and quasi-judicial panels. They work for courts, provincial and federal legislative assemblies and committees, or they may be self-employed. Medical transcriptionists record, transcribe and edit dictation by physicians and other health care providers, surgical proceedings, health-related reports and other medical documentation. They work for hospitals, medical clinics and doctors' offices, or they may be self-employed. Closed captioners and other transcriptionists are included in this group.

Job Outlook

Average

Read more

  • Estimate Stable employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 50 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate Moderate rate of unemployment in 2019

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

  • Estimate -1305 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4210 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. The number employed in this occupation is expected to remain largely the same over the next few years. With a large percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to be a key contributor to employment opportunities over the coming years. Court Reporters, Medical Transcriptionists, and Related Workers most commonly work full-time hours. Also, a fair portion of the workforce is self-employed, so having the option to "work for yourself" may appeal to some individuals’ interests/motivations.

The median employment income for 52% of Court Reporters, Medical Transcriptionists, and Related Workers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $38,365. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$18.00

Minimum

$22.00

Median

$28.40

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,632

Minimum

$35,369

Median

$53,951

Maximum

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

Hourly Pay

$14.00

Minimum

$27.85

Median

$38.46

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,754

Minimum

$36,515

Median

$70,271

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Court reporters record and transcribe the proceedings of courts, legislative assemblies and committees, and prepare transcripts for use by judges, tribunals and quasi-judicial panels. They work for courts, provincial and federal legislative assemblies and committees, or they may be self-employed.

Medical transcriptionists record, transcribe and edit dictation by physicians and other health care providers, surgical proceedings, health-related reports and other medical documentation. They work for hospitals, medical clinics and doctors' offices, or they may be self-employed. Closed captioners and other transcriptionists are included in this group.

Job duties

Court reporters:

  • Record proceedings of courtroom using electronic stenograph machine or steno mask.
  • Respond to requests during court sessions to read back verbatim evidence.
  • Transcribe recorded proceedings in appropriate formats.
  • Verify accuracy of transcripts by checking copy against original record of proceedings and accuracy of rulings by checking with judge.
  • Research and locate quotes to make sure they are accurate.
  • Respond to requests for transcripts ordered by judges, lawyers or the public.
  • File and store shorthand notes of court session.

Medical transcriptionists:

  • Transcribe recorded dictation in appropriate formats or written documentation from medical reports, correspondence, health records and patient information.
  • Proofread work for errors.
  • Edit transcripts for missing or incorrect content and formatting.

Sample job titles

  • braille transcriber
  • closed captioner
  • court recorder
  • court reporter
  • court stenographer
  • dictatypist
  • media transcriber
  • medical transcriptionist
  • transcriptionist

Skills

You need accurate and fast transcription and typing speeds, as well as excellent proofreading skills.

Job requirements

  • Court reporters need a high school diploma and usually need a college or other program in court reporting. They may also need the Chartered Shorthand Reporter (CSR) certificate.
  • Medical transcriptionists need a high school diploma and usually need to complete a recognized medical transcription program. They may also need the Certified Medical Transcriptionist (CMT) certificate.

Other considerations

These jobs may cause back and neck strain due to sitting for long periods of time, as well as eye strain from computer screens. There is some movement between jobs in this group and other jobs requiring similar knowledge of legal or medical terminology like legal or medical administrative positions.

By the numbers

Quick look

450

employed in 2016

75.6%

employed full-time

26.7%

self employed

94.4%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
5.6%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
52.9

median age

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

63,775

employed in 2016

78.4%

employed full-time

6.6%

self employed

73.4%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
26.6%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
47.9

median age

Where will I likely work?

56.7%

Halifax

14.4%

North Shore

12.2%

Cape Breton

8.9%

Annapolis Valley

7.8%

Southern

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

41.6%

Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services

36.4%

Health care and social assistance

16.9%

Public administration

5.2%

Professional, scientific and technical services

What is the age of Employment?

33.0%

55-64

31.0%

45-54

17.0%

35-44

10.0%

65+

9.0%

25-34

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

26.3%

45-54

22.6%

55-64

19.4%

35-44

16.7%

25-34

7.5%

65+

Top levels of education

59.3%

College Diploma

$35,897 median annual income
16.5%

Bachelor

$21,364 median annual income
12.1%

High school

$41,579 median annual income
4.4%

Diploma Below Bachelor

N/A
3.3%

Less than high school

N/A

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

33.8%

College Diploma

$36,304 median annual income
23.8%

High school

$32,903 median annual income
22.8%

Bachelor

$41,755 median annual income
5.8%

Trade Certification

$34,807 median annual income
4.9%

Less than high school

$23,174 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Association of Administrative Professionals
Halifax, NS
Nova Scotia Department of Justice, Courts Services Division
Halifax, NS
Nova Scotia Court Transcriber Certification Program
Halifax, NS
Canadian Health Information Management Association
London, ON

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.