Electronics Assemblers, Fabricators, Inspectors and Testers

(NOC 9523)

in All Manufacturing and Utilities

Electronics assemblers and fabricators assemble and make electronic equipment, parts and components. Electronics inspectors and testers inspect and test electronic and electromechanical assemblies, subassemblies, parts and components to make sure they meet prescribed standards. They work for electronics manufacturing plants.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

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  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate openings due to growth and retirements not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

  • Estimate 75 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 1460 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Electronics Assemblers, Fabricators, Inspectors, and Testers most commonly work full-time hours.

The median employment income for 69% of Electronics Assemblers, Fabricators, Inspectors, and Testers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $38,580. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$14.00

Minimum

$17.50

Median

$22.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$10,236

Minimum

$35,640

Median

$68,159

Maximum

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

Hourly Pay

$13.00

Minimum

$23.91

Median

$35.04

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,056

Minimum

$30,111

Median

$70,518

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Electronics assemblers and fabricators assemble and make electronic equipment, parts and components. Electronics inspectors and testers inspect and test electronic and electromechanical assemblies, subassemblies, parts and components to make sure they meet prescribed standards. They work for electronics manufacturing plants.

Job duties

Electronics assemblers:

  • Solder and manually assemble electronic components like resistors, diodes, transistors, capacitors, integrated circuits, switches, wires and other electronic parts to designated locations on printed circuit boards.
  • Assemble microcircuits requiring fine hand assembly, the use of microscopes and follow cleanroom procedures.
  • Install, mount, fasten, align and adjust parts, components, wiring and harnesses to subassemblies and assemblies using hand and small power tools.
  • Use machines to position, solder and clean components on printed circuit boards.
  • May replace defective components and repair and overhaul older devices.

Electronics fabricators:

  • Use and monitor process equipment and machines to make electronic components, solder, clean, seal and stamp components and perform other process operations as specified.
  • Set up process equipment and follow cleanroom procedures as required.

Electronics inspectors:

  • Inspect electronic components and assemblies to confirm correct component selection and placement, wiring and soldering quality, proper pin insertions, location and diameter of plated holes, breaks in circuitry and line spacing in printed circuit board and other requirements while products are being assembled or made.
  • Check final assembly for finish, labelling and packaging methods.
  • Check mechanical dimensions and perform "go-no-go" electrical tests.
  • Identify and mark acceptable and defective assemblies and return faulty assemblies to production for repair.
  • Collect, record and summarize inspection results.
  • Investigate equipment malfunction and instruct on proper operation.

Electronics testers:

  • Use test equipment and tools to perform simple electrical and continuity testing of electronic components, parts and systems.
  • Set up and use automatic testing equipment to locate circuit and wiring faults, shorts and component defects.
  • Compare test results to specifications and set parts or products aside for repair or replace components or parts as indicated by test equipment.
  • May carry out life tests (burn-ins) on components, subassemblies and assemblies.
  • Maintain test result reports.

Sample job titles

  • capacitor assembler
  • circuit board assembler
  • component inserting machine operator
  • crystal final tester
  • electronic components tester
  • electronics inspector
  • precision instrument assembler
  • printed circuit board (PCB) assembly inspector
  • surface mount assembler
  • through-hole assembler
  • wafer fabrication operator
  • wave soldering machine operator
  • wiring and assembly operator

Skills

This work requires excellent spatial perception, form perception, and eye-to-finger coordination. You must be accurate and able to pay close attention to detail. A keen interest in working with machines and routine processes is necessary. You should also be physically fit and have good eyesight and hearing.

Job requirements

  • High school is required.
  • On-the-job training is usually provided for jobs in this group.
  • Electronics testers may need college courses in basic electronic theory, testing techniques and testing equipment.
  • Electronics inspectors and testers may need experience as an electronics assembler or component fabricator.

Other considerations

Movement from electronics assembler or component fabricator to electronics inspector or tester is possible with additional training and experience. Self-employment in these jobs is rare, and work is not typically seasonal.

By the numbers

Quick look

355

employed in 2016

98.6%

employed full-time

2.8%

self employed

53.5%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
46.5%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
47.2

median age

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

15,275

employed in 2016

83.2%

employed full-time

3.2%

self employed

27.6%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
72.4%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
44.7

median age

Where will I likely work?

68.5%

Halifax

12.3%

Southern

8.2%

North Shore

8.2%

Annapolis Valley

2.7%

Cape Breton

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

83.6%

Manufacturing

3.3%

Public administration

3.3%

Transportation and warehousing

3.3%

Information and cultural industries

3.3%

Professional, scientific and technical services

What is the age of Employment?

26.0%

45-54

26.0%

35-44

24.0%

55-64

17.0%

25-34

4.0%

15-24

3.0%

65+

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

24.5%

45-54

20.8%

55-64

19.3%

35-44

16.5%

25-34

15.0%

15-24

Top levels of education

36.6%

High school

$34,914 median annual income
35.2%

College Diploma

$37,003 median annual income
14.1%

Less than high school

$35,186 median annual income
8.5%

Bachelor

$40,485 median annual income
4.2%

Trade Certification

N/A

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

38.1%

High school

$28,505 median annual income
23.3%

Less than high school

$19,224 median annual income
19.9%

College Diploma

$38,781 median annual income
12.2%

Trade Certification

$43,975 median annual income
4.5%

Bachelor

$39,715 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of electrical, electronics and communication engineers. They include courses in electrical circuitry, prototype development and testing; systems analysis and testing, systems maintenance, instrument calibration, and report preparation.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College - Kingstec Campus

Kentville, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Pictou Campus & School of Fisheries

Stellarton, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Marconi Campus

Sydney, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Ivany Campus

Dartmouth, NS

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of engineers engaged in developing and testing automated, servomechanical, and other electromechanical systems. They include courses in prototype testing, manufacturing and operational testing, systems analysis and maintenance procedures, and report preparation.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College - Pictou Campus & School of Fisheries

Stellarton, NS

Engineering Technology - General

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of engineers engaged in a wide variety of projects. They include courses in various engineering support functions for research, production, and operations, and applications to specific engineering specialties.

Institutions providing this program

Cape Breton University

Sydney, NS

Industrial Electronics Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to assemble, install, operate, maintain, and repair electrical/electronic equipment used in industry and manufacturing. They include courses in installing, maintaining and testing various types of equipment.

Institutions providing this program

Apprenticeship Training

Halifax, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

No contacts were found under this occupation profile

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.