Photographic and Film Processors

(NOC 9474)

in All Manufacturing and Utilities

Photographic and film processors process and finish still photographic film and motion picture film. They work for film processing laboratories and retail photofinishing companies.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

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  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate openings due to growth and retirements not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

  • Estimate 75 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 1460 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Photographic and Film Processors may either be working full-time or part-time hours.

The median employment income for 26% of Photographic and Film Processors who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

N/A

Minimum

N/A

Median

N/A

Maximum

Annual Pay

N/A

Minimum

$15,814

Median

N/A

Maximum

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

Hourly Pay

$13.00

Minimum

$23.91

Median

$35.04

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,056

Minimum

$30,111

Median

$70,518

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Photographic and film processors process and finish still photographic film and motion picture film. They work for film processing laboratories and retail photofinishing companies.

Job duties

Photographic and film processors:

  • Use equipment to develop negatives and slides, and to print black and white and colour photographs.
  • Use photographic enlarging equipment to produce prints and enlargements from negatives.
  • Use equipment to develop motion picture film.
  • Tend equipment in retail shops to develop colour negatives, prints and slides.
  • Use equipment to transfer film to video tape.
  • Retouch photographic negatives or original prints to correct defects.
  • Splice film and mount film on reels.
  • Measure and mix chemicals required for processing.
  • Inspect rolls of photographic prints for conformance to specifications; or motion picture film to detect defects in developing and printing.

Sample job titles

  • darkroom technician
  • film developer
  • film printing machine operator
  • film processer
  • photofinisher
  • photograph developer
  • photograph inspector
  • photographic processor

Skills

You should be responsible and alert. Coordination and a mechanical skill are important. You must also be able to take direction and carry out instructions given by a supervisor.

Job requirements

  • High school is usually required.
  • A college or other specialized photography program or extensive related experience is required for work in film processing laboratories.
  • On-the-job training is provided for work as a film printing machine operator in retail outlets.

Other considerations

There is movement among jobs within laboratory processing operations. Movement is possible from automatic machine tenders in retail shops to laboratory processing jobs.

By the numbers

Quick look

95

employed in 2016

42.1%

employed full-time

0.0%

self employed

78.9%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
21.1%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
32.6

median age

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

15,275

employed in 2016

83.2%

employed full-time

3.2%

self employed

27.6%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
72.4%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
44.7

median age

Where will I likely work?

63.2%

Halifax

15.8%

Annapolis Valley

10.5%

Southern

10.5%

North Shore

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

38.9%

Retail trade

16.7%

Other services (except public administration)

11.1%

Construction

11.1%

Public administration

11.1%

Information and cultural industries

What is the age of Employment?

35.0%

15-24

20.0%

35-44

20.0%

25-34

15.0%

55-64

10.0%

45-54

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

24.5%

45-54

20.8%

55-64

19.3%

35-44

16.5%

25-34

15.0%

15-24

Top levels of education

47.4%

High school

$10,735 median annual income
26.3%

College Diploma

N/A
10.5%

Less than high school

N/A
10.5%

Bachelor

N/A

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

38.1%

High school

$28,505 median annual income
23.3%

Less than high school

$19,224 median annual income
19.9%

College Diploma

$38,781 median annual income
12.2%

Trade Certification

$43,975 median annual income
4.5%

Bachelor

$39,715 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Photography

College, Trades, or University Program

These programs focus on the principles and techniques of communicating information, ideas, moods, and feelings through the creation of images on photographic film, plates, digital images and that prepares individuals to be professional photographic artists. They include courses in camera and equipment operation and maintenance, film and plate developing, light and composition, films and printing media, colour and special effects, photographic art, photographic history, use of computer applications to record or enhance images and applications to the photography of various subjects.

Institutions providing this program

NSCAD University

Halifax, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Ivany Campus

Dartmouth, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Canadian Printing Industries Association
Laval, QC

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.