Delivery and Courier Service Drivers

(NOC 7514)

in All Trades and Transportation

Delivery and courier service drivers drive cars, vans, and light trucks to pick up and deliver various products. Courier service drivers pick up envelopes and/or packages for quick delivery to a specific address. They work for dairies, drug stores, newspaper distributors, take-out food companies, dry cleaners, mobile caterers, courier and messenger service companies and many other businesses, or they may be self-employed.

Job Outlook

Average

Read more

  • Estimate Stable employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 95 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate High rate of unemployment in 2019

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

  • Estimate 205 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4385 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a fairly large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities occur fairly regularly. The number employed in this occupation is expected to remain largely the same over the next few years. With a large percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to be a key contributor to employment opportunities over the coming years. Delivery and Courier Service Drivers most commonly work full-time hours.

The median employment income for 52% of Delivery and Courier Service Drivers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $35,298. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$12.55

Minimum

$14.00

Median

$26.00

Maximum

Annual Pay

$5,083

Minimum

$26,500

Median

$57,673

Maximum

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

Hourly Pay

$13.50

Minimum

$27.25

Median

$35.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,580

Minimum

$37,269

Median

$79,787

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Delivery and courier service drivers drive cars, vans, and light trucks to pick up and deliver various products. Courier service drivers pick up envelopes and/or packages for quick delivery to a specific address. They work for dairies, drug stores, newspaper distributors, take-out food companies, dry cleaners, mobile caterers, courier and messenger service companies and many other businesses, or they may be self-employed.

Job duties

Delivery and courier service drivers:

  • Drive cars, vans and light trucks to pick up and deliver various products like fast food, newspapers, magazines, bakery and dairy products, and items like dry cleaning, envelopes, packages and parcels.
  • Perform pre-trip and post-trip inspection of vehicle.
  • Plan delivery travel schedules and service routes.
  • Load and unload cargo, goods, or merchandise.
  • Provide customer service by selling products, delivering over established routes, and accepting or making payments for goods.
  • Record information on pick-ups and deliveries, vehicle mileage and fuel costs and report any incidents or problems encountered.
  • May scan and sort freight or cargo for delivery.
  • May assemble, install or set-up delivered goods or merchandise.
  • May communicate with central dispatch using mobile communications equipment.

Sample job titles

  • courier driver
  • delivery driver
  • delivery salesperson
  • delivery truck driver
  • fast food delivery driver
  • newspaper delivery driver
  • route driver

Skills

You should enjoy driving and be able to function under minimal supervision. You must be alert, responsible, and self-motivated. An awareness of safety is important. You must also get along well with people, as drivers often deal directly with customers. For some jobs, you should be willing to drive long distances and for extended periods of time.

Job requirements

  • High school is usually required.
  • A driver's licence appropriate to the class of vehicle being driven is required.
  • One year of safe driving experience is usually required.
  • On-the-job training is provided.
  • Eligibility for bonding and transportation of dangerous goods (TGD) certification may be required for delivery and courier drivers.

Other considerations

Movement to supervisory positions or to non-driving jobs like driver trainer or dispatcher is possible with additional training or experience.

By the numbers

Quick look

2,165

employed in 2016

73.6%

employed full-time

8.8%

self employed

8.6%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
91.4%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
46.6

median age

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

57,925

employed in 2016

85.9%

employed full-time

11.8%

self employed

5.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
94.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
46.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

44.8%

Halifax

16.7%

Annapolis Valley

16.5%

North Shore

12.3%

Cape Breton

9.7%

Southern

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

33.8%

Transportation and warehousing

25.1%

Retail trade

11.4%

Wholesale trade

9.7%

Accommodation and food services

9.5%

Manufacturing

What is the age of Employment?

23.0%

45-54

21.0%

55-64

19.0%

35-44

18.0%

25-34

10.0%

15-24

9.0%

65+

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

24.4%

45-54

22.1%

55-64

17.7%

35-44

17.7%

25-34

10.9%

15-24

Top levels of education

38.3%

High school

$27,205 median annual income
23.6%

Less than high school

$21,520 median annual income
17.3%

College certificate or diploma

$25,749 median annual income
13.6%

Trades certificate

$32,308 median annual income
4.4%

Bachelor's degree

$20,918 median annual income

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

29.2%

Trades certificate

$46,494 median annual income
25.5%

High school

$31,260 median annual income
22.3%

College certificate or diploma

$42,050 median annual income
18.7%

Less than high school

$28,319 median annual income
2.8%

Bachelor's degree

$30,527 median annual income

Education & training

Adult high school/secondary diploma programs

This program is typically offered at the high school level.

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Siège Social: 1695, Route 1

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS B0W 1M0

(902) 769-2114

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

PO Box 220

Halifax, NS B3J 2M4

(866) 679-6722

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Canadian Courier & Logistics Association
Unit 119 – 660 Eglinton Avenue East, Box 333
Toronto, ON M4G 2K2
Tel: (416) 696-9995

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.

Job postings

NEWSPAPER DELIVERY DRIVER CALEDONIA/BRAEMAR/WAVERLEY

Needed ASAP - Overnight newspaper carriers

Newspaper Carrier

View all job postings