Motor Vehicle Body Repairers

(NOC 7322)

in All Trades and Transportation

Motor vehicle body repairers repair and restore damaged motor vehicle body parts and interior finishing, repaint body surfaces, and repair and/or replace automotive glass. They work for automobile dealerships, automobile body repair shops and automobile appraisal centres. This group also includes metal repairers who repair defective automobile body parts and damage to the bodies of newly assembled cars. They work for motor vehicle manufacturers.

Job Outlook

Average

Read more

  • Estimate Decline sharply employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate -40 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate Moderate rate of unemployment in 2019

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

  • Estimate 205 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4385 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a moderate sized occupation in Nova Scotia so some job opportunities may occur through turnover. The number employed in this occupation is expected to decline moderately over the next few years, which will likely limit the number of new opportunities available. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Motor Vehicle Body Repairers most commonly work full-time hours. Also, a fair portion of the workforce is self-employed, so having the option to "work for yourself" may appeal to some individuals’ interests/motivations.

The median employment income for 74% of Motor Vehicle Body Repairers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $42,461. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$17.25

Minimum

$23.00

Median

$36.06

Maximum

Annual Pay

$8,880

Minimum

$40,385

Median

$72,337

Maximum

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

Hourly Pay

$13.50

Minimum

$27.25

Median

$35.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,580

Minimum

$37,269

Median

$79,787

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Motor vehicle body repairers repair and restore damaged motor vehicle body parts and interior finishing, repaint body surfaces, and repair and/or replace automotive glass. They work for automobile dealerships, automobile body repair shops and automobile appraisal centres. This group also includes metal repairers who repair defective automobile body parts and damage to the bodies of newly assembled cars. They work for motor vehicle manufacturers.

Job duties

Workers in this group:

  • Review damage report and estimates of repair cost and plan work to be performed.
  • Repair and replace front end components, body components, doors and frame and underbody components.
  • Hammer out dents, buckles and other defects using blocks and hammers.
  • Use soldering equipment or use plastic filler to fill holes, dents, and seams.
  • Remove damaged fenders, panels and grills using wrenches and cutting torch and bolt or weld replacement parts into place.
  • Straighten bent frames using frame and underbody pulling and anchoring equipment.
  • File, grind, and sand repaired body surfaces using hand and power tools.
  • Mask and tape auto body surfaces in preparation for painting.
  • Mix paint, blend, and match colors.
  • Apply primers and repaint surfaces using brush or spray guns.
  • Repair and replace glass components like windshields, windows, and sunroofs.
  • Repair or replace interior components like seat frame assembly, carpets, and floorboard insulation.
  • Inspect repaired vehicles and test drive vehicles for proper handling.

Sample job titles

  • autobody mechanic
  • autobody repairer
  • autobody technician
  • automotive glass technician
  • automotive painter
  • motor vehicle body repairer
  • motor vehicle body technician

Skills

You should have mechanical aptitude, as well as patience, reliability, coordination, and agility. Lightness of touch and attention to detail are important. Some physical strength may be needed. This work requires excellent spatial and form perception. You should be able to visualize a finished piece of work from a sketch or brief description.

Job requirements

Motor vehicle body repairers

  • High school is usually required.
  • A three- to four-year motor vehicle body repair apprenticeship program or a combination of over three years of work experience in the motor vehicle body repair trade and completion of a high school or college automotive body repair program is usually required to be eligible for trade certification.
  • Trade certification for motor vehicle body repairers (metal and paint) is compulsory in Nova Scotia.
  • Red Seal Endorsement (RSE) is also available to qualified motor vehicle body repairers (metal and paint) upon successful completion of the interprovincial Red Seal examination.

Automotive painters

  • High school is usually required.
  • A two- to three-year automotive painter apprenticeship program or a combination of one year of work experience in the automotive painter trade and completion of a high school or college automotive painting program is usually required for automotive painter trade certification.
  • Automotive painter certification is available, but voluntary, in Nova Scotia.
  • Red Seal Endorsement (RSE) is also available to qualified automotive painters upon successful completion of the interprovincial Red Seal examination.

Other jobs in this group

  • Automotive glass installers usually need high school. Auto glass industry certification is usually required.
  • Metal repairers, motor vehicle manufacturing usually need high school. One to two years of on-the-job training are provided.

Other considerations

Motor vehicle body repair and automotive painter tradespersons may progress to supervisory positions with experience. Metal repairers employed in motor vehicle manufacturing may progress to motor vehicle repairer positions through an apprenticeship program, or, with experience, they may progress to supervisory positions in motor vehicle manufacturing.

By the numbers

Quick look

800

employed in 2016

90.6%

employed full-time

16.9%

self employed

5.0%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
95%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
48.5

median age

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

57,925

employed in 2016

85.9%

employed full-time

11.8%

self employed

5.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
94.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
46.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

37.3%

Halifax

21.1%

North Shore

18.0%

Annapolis Valley

17.4%

Southern

6.2%

Cape Breton

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

75.4%

Other services (except public administration)

11.6%

Retail trade

4.3%

Transportation and warehousing

2.2%

Construction

2.2%

Wholesale trade

What is the age of Employment?

30.0%

45-54

22.0%

55-64

16.0%

35-44

16.0%

25-34

9.0%

15-24

7.0%

65+

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

24.4%

45-54

22.1%

55-64

17.7%

35-44

17.7%

25-34

10.9%

15-24

Top levels of education

39.0%

Apprenticeship

$42,312 median annual income
25.8%

College Diploma

$42,158 median annual income
17.0%

High school

$40,307 median annual income
15.7%

Less than high school

$22,162 median annual income
2.5%

Bachelor

N/A

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

29.2%

Apprenticeship

$46,494 median annual income
25.5%

High school

$31,260 median annual income
22.3%

College Diploma

$42,050 median annual income
18.7%

Less than high school

$28,319 median annual income
2.8%

Bachelor

$30,527 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Siploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Autobody/Collision and Repair Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to repair, reconstruct and finish automobile bodies, fenders, and external features. They include courses in structure analysis, damage repair, non-structural analysis, mechanical and electrical components, plastics and adhesives, painting and refinishing techniques, and damage analysis and estimating.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College - Akerley Campus

Dartmouth, NS

Apprenticeship Training

Halifax, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

Regulations

Automotive Glass Technician

Certificate of Qualification (Voluntary): This job is a designated trade in Nova Scotia. Employers may require certification, but a certificate is not needed to legally do this work.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
1256 Barrington Street, 3rd Fl, Box 578
Halifax, NS B3J 2S9
(800) 494-5651
Automotive Refinishing Technician

Certificate of Qualification (Voluntary): This job is a designated trade in Nova Scotia. Employers may require certification, but a certificate is not needed to legally do this work.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
1256 Barrington Street, 3rd Fl, Box 578
Halifax, NS B3J 2S9
(800) 494-5651
Auto Body and Collision Technician

Compulsory Certification (Mandatory): This job is a regulated designated trade in Nova Scotia. A valid Certification of Qualification, an apprentice ID, or a temporary work permit is required to legally do this work.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
1256 Barrington Street, 3rd Fl, Box 578
Halifax, NS B3J 2S9
(800) 494-5651

Contacts

Automotive Human Resource Sector Council of Nova Scotia
Dartmouth, NS