Purchasing and Inventory Control Workers

(NOC 1524)

in All Business, Finance, and Administration

Purchasing and inventory control workers process purchasing transactions and maintain inventories of materials, equipment and stock. They work for retail and wholesale companies, manufacturing companies, government agencies and other organizations.

Job Outlook

Average

Read more

  • Estimate Decline sharply employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 10 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate Low rate of unemployment in 2019

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

  • Estimate -1305 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4210 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a moderate sized occupation in Nova Scotia so some job opportunities may occur through turnover. The number employed in this occupation is expected to decline moderately over the next few years, which will likely limit the number of new opportunities available. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Purchasing and Inventory Control Workers most commonly work full-time hours.

The median employment income for 53% of Purchasing and Inventory Control Workers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $43,017. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$12.95

Minimum

$18.75

Median

$26.44

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,376

Minimum

$31,771

Median

$58,699

Maximum

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

Hourly Pay

$14.00

Minimum

$27.85

Median

$38.46

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,754

Minimum

$36,515

Median

$70,271

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Purchasing and inventory control workers process purchasing transactions and maintain inventories of materials, equipment and stock. They work for retail and wholesale companies, manufacturing companies, government agencies and other organizations.

Job duties

Purchasing control workers:

  • Review orders for accuracy and verify that materials, equipment and stock are not available from current inventories.
  • Source and get price quotes from catalogues and suppliers and prepare purchase orders.
  • Calculate cost of orders and charge or forward invoices to correct accounts.
  • Process purchases within purchasing authority.
  • Contact suppliers to schedule deliveries and to work out shortages, missed deliveries and other problems.
  • Prepare and maintain purchasing files, reports and price lists.

Inventory control workers:

  • Use inventory systems to monitor inventory levels as materials, equipment and stock are issued, transferred within an organization or sold to the public.
  • Compile inventory reports, recording the quantity, type and value of materials, equipment and stock on hand, using manual or computerized inventory systems.
  • Prepare orders to restock materials, equipment and stock.
  • Maintain stock rotation and dispose of and account for outdated stock.
  • Enter data for production scheduling, stock replacement/relocation and inventory adjustments.
  • Reconcile physical inventories with computer counts.

Sample job titles

  • inventory clerk
  • inventory control clerk
  • inventory planner
  • procurement clerk
  • purchase order clerk
  • purchasing clerk
  • purchasing clerk assistant
  • purchasing control clerk
  • supply clerk

Skills

You must be organized and attentive to detail. Your work must be accurate. Good communication skills are important. You need to be able to work as part of a team. Computer skills and the ability to work with technology may be helpful.

Job requirements

  • High school is usually required.
  • Courses in purchasing management may be required for purchasing clerks.
  • Courses in production and inventory management and ability to operate a computerized inventory system may be required for inventory clerks.

Other considerations

The duties of purchasing and inventory clerks may overlap in some businesses. Movement to supervisor positions or more senior jobs like purchasing agent or retail buyer is possible with additional training or experience.

By the numbers

Quick look

790

employed in 2016

79.9%

employed full-time

0.0%

self employed

45.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
54.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
45.4

median age

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

63,775

employed in 2016

78.4%

employed full-time

6.6%

self employed

73.4%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
26.6%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
47.9

median age

Where will I likely work?

55.1%

Halifax

17.1%

North Shore

13.9%

Annapolis Valley

10.1%

Southern

3.8%

Cape Breton

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

28.9%

Retail trade

14.0%

Wholesale trade

11.6%

Public administration

10.7%

Manufacturing

10.7%

Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services

What is the age of Employment?

25.0%

45-54

23.0%

55-64

18.0%

35-44

17.0%

25-34

13.0%

15-24

4.0%

65+

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

26.3%

45-54

22.6%

55-64

19.4%

35-44

16.7%

25-34

7.5%

65+

Top levels of education

41.8%

High school

$30,505 median annual income
31.0%

College Diploma

$33,179 median annual income
11.4%

Bachelor

$25,825 median annual income
8.9%

Less than high school

$30,002 median annual income
3.8%

Trade Certification

N/A

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

33.8%

College Diploma

$36,304 median annual income
23.8%

High school

$32,903 median annual income
22.8%

Bachelor

$41,755 median annual income
5.8%

Trade Certification

$34,807 median annual income
4.9%

Less than high school

$23,174 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Supply Chain Canada - Nova Scotia Institute
Halifax, NS

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.