Mail, Postal, and Related Workers

(NOC 1511)

in All Business, Finance, and Administration

This group includes workers who process and sort mail and parcels in post offices, mail processing plants and internal mail rooms, and clerks who serve customers and record transactions at sales counters and postal wickets. Mail, postal and related workers work for Canada Post Corporation, courier and parcel express companies and throughout the public and private sectors.

Job Outlook

average

Read more

  • Estimate Weak growth employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 60 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate Moderate rate of unemployment in 2022

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

  • Estimate 3555 employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 9370 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a moderate sized occupation in Nova Scotia so some job opportunities may occur through turnover. The number employed in this occupation is expected to grow slightly over the next few years, which should provide some additional opportunities for employment. With a large percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to be a key contributor to employment opportunities over the coming years. Mail, Postal, and Related Workers may either be working full-time or part-time hours. Furthermore, the jobs are typically permanent positions.

Hourly Pay

$13.35

Minimum

$20.00

Median

$28.00

Maximum

Annual Pay

$2,724

Minimum

$35,900

Median

$57,777

Maximum

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

Hourly Pay

$15.00

Minimum

$23.00

Median

$38.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,754

Minimum

$36,515

Median

$70,271

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

This group includes workers who process and sort mail and parcels in post offices, mail processing plants and internal mail rooms, and clerks who serve customers and record transactions at sales counters and postal wickets. Mail, postal and related workers work for Canada Post Corporation, courier and parcel express companies and throughout the public and private sectors.

Job duties

Postal workers:

  • Calculate and attach the correct postage on letters, parcels and registered mail and receive payment from customers.
  • Sell stamps, prepaid mail and courier envelopes and money orders.
  • Route mail to the proper delivery stream.
  • Sign or get signatures from recipients for registered or special delivery mail and keep records.
  • Answer questions and complete forms about change of address, theft or loss of mail.
  • Record and balance daily transactions.

Mail sorters:

  • Sort mail according to destination.
  • Bundle, label, bag and route sorted mail to the proper delivery stream.
  • Search directories to find the correct address for redirected mail.

Mailroom clerks:

  • Receive, process, sort and distribute incoming and outgoing mail, faxes, messages and courier packages manually or electronically.
  • Maintain address databases and produce personalized mailings.
  • Print and photocopy material, and address and stuff envelopes.
  • Weigh outgoing mail, calculate and attach proper postage, and bundle by postal code.
  • May use and maintain print shop and mailing house equipment.

Sample job titles

  • letter sorting clerk
  • mail clerk
  • mail counter clerk
  • mail distribution clerk
  • mail filing clerk
  • mail handler
  • mail processing clerk
  • mail sorter
  • post office clerk
  • postal clerk

Skills

  • You must be organized, responsible, and reliable. Your work must be accurate. Good health and physical stamina may be needed.

Job requirements

  • High school and some college office administration courses may be required.

Other considerations

  • Movement to supervisor or facility management positions is possible with additional training or experience.

By the numbers

Quick look

1,100

employed in 2016

53.6%

employed full-time

0.9%

self employed

67.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
32.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
53

median age

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

63,775

employed in 2016

78.4%

employed full-time

6.6%

self employed

73.4%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
26.6%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
47.9

median age

Where will I likely work?

49.8%

Halifax

$36,490 median annual income
16.9%

North Shore

$40,522 median annual income
13.7%

Cape Breton

$38,032 median annual income
10.5%

Annapolis Valley

$25,180 median annual income
9.1%

Southern

$24,212 median annual income

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

83.0%

Transportation and warehousing

6.6%

Public administration

2.2%

Health care and social assistance

1.6%

Manufacturing

1.1%

Professional, scientific and technical services

What is the age of Employment?

29.0%

55-64

27.0%

45-54

18.0%

35-44

13.0%

65+

10.0%

25-34

5.0%

15-24

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

26.3%

45-54

22.6%

55-64

19.4%

35-44

16.7%

25-34

7.5%

65+

Top levels of education

39.7%

High school

$29,506 median annual income
26.9%

College Diploma

$38,131 median annual income
12.3%

Bachelor

$34,693 median annual income
10.0%

Less than high school

$38,104 median annual income
8.2%

Trade Certification

$35,851 median annual income

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

33.8%

College Diploma

$36,304 median annual income
23.8%

High school

$32,903 median annual income
22.8%

Bachelor

$41,755 median annual income
5.8%

Trade Certification

$34,807 median annual income
4.9%

Less than high school

$23,174 median annual income

Education & training

High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

Adults without a high school diploma can contact the Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) for tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL oversees adult education programs in Nova Scotia. NSSAL partners with the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations to deliver programs. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Canada Post Corporation
Halifax, NS

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.