Data Entry Clerks

(NOC 1422)

in All Business, Finance, and Administration

Data entry clerks input coded, statistical, financial and other information into computerized databases, spreadsheets or other templates using a keyboard, mouse, or optical scanner, speech recognition software or other data entry tools. They work throughout the private and public sectors.

Job Outlook

Limited

Read more

  • Estimate Decline employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 85 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate High rate of unemployment in 2022

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

  • Estimate 3555 employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 9370 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “limited”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is below average when compared with other occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a moderate sized occupation in Nova Scotia so some job opportunities may occur through turnover. However, jobseekers may face some competition for those positions. The number employed in this occupation is expected to decline slightly over the next few years, which may affect the number of new opportunities available. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Data Entry Clerks most commonly work full-time hours. Furthermore, the jobs are typically permanent positions.

The median employment income for 43% of Data Entry Clerks who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $37,729. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$13.79

Minimum

$18.50

Median

$25.93

Maximum

Annual Pay

$5,190

Minimum

$24,247

Median

$47,716

Maximum

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

Hourly Pay

$14.00

Minimum

$27.85

Median

$38.46

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,754

Minimum

$36,515

Median

$70,271

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Data entry clerks input coded, statistical, financial and other information into computerized databases, spreadsheets or other templates using a keyboard, mouse, or optical scanner, speech recognition software or other data entry tools. They work throughout the private and public sectors.

Job duties

Data entry clerks:

  • Receive and register invoices, forms, records and other documents for data capture.
  • Input data into computer databases, spreadsheets or other templates using a keyboard, mouse, or optical scanner, speech recognition software or other data entry tools.
  • Import and/or export data between different kinds of software.
  • Verify accuracy and completeness of data.
  • Identify, label and organize electronic storage media.
  • Maintain libraries of electronic storage media.

Sample job titles

  • computer equipment operator
  • data control clerk
  • data entry clerk
  • data processing verifier
  • data processor
  • EDP (electronic data-processing) equipment operator
  • electronic data-processing (EDP) equipment operator
  • payment input clerk

Skills

  • You require finger dexterity and the ability to sit still for long periods of time, and should not mind repetitive tasks. A solid foundation in computer skills is often necessary for entry into these jobs. Good communication and interpersonal skills are also important, along with a willingness to learn and adapt to continually changing equipment and software.

Job requirements

  • High school may be required.
  • College or other courses in data entry may be required.

Other considerations

  • Movement to senior positions is possible with experience.

By the numbers

Quick look

1,245

employed in 2016

74.3%

employed full-time

0.8%

self employed

75.1%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
24.9%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
42.1

median age

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

63,775

employed in 2016

78.4%

employed full-time

6.6%

self employed

73.4%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
26.6%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
47.9

median age

Where will I likely work?

56.4%

Halifax

$28,199 median annual income
14.4%

Cape Breton

$16,581 median annual income
13.2%

North Shore

$28,190 median annual income
10.4%

Annapolis Valley

$11,317 median annual income
5.6%

Southern

$17,290 median annual income

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

17.8%

Public administration

15.2%

Retail trade

14.7%

Health care and social assistance

12.6%

Finance and insurance

7.3%

Information and cultural industries

What is the age of Employment?

23.0%

25-34

20.0%

45-54

19.0%

35-44

16.0%

15-24

15.0%

55-64

8.0%

65+

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

26.3%

45-54

22.6%

55-64

19.4%

35-44

16.7%

25-34

7.5%

65+

Top levels of education

34.8%

High school

$20,554 median annual income
33.6%

College Diploma

$28,933 median annual income
17.2%

Bachelor

$16,975 median annual income
5.2%

Less than high school

$31,638 median annual income
4.4%

Trade Certification

$32,770 median annual income

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

33.8%

College Diploma

$36,304 median annual income
23.8%

High school

$32,903 median annual income
22.8%

Bachelor

$41,755 median annual income
5.8%

Trade Certification

$34,807 median annual income
4.9%

Less than high school

$23,174 median annual income

Education & training

High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

Adults without a high school diploma can contact the Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) for tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL oversees adult education programs in Nova Scotia. NSSAL partners with the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations to deliver programs. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Association of Administrative Professionals
Halifax, NS

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.