Industrial Electrical Motors and Transformers Assemblers, Fabricators and Inspectors

(NOC 9525)

in All Manufacturing and Utilities

Industrial electrical motors and transformers assemblers, fabricators and inspectors assemble, make, fit, wire and inspect heavy-duty industrial electrical equipment. They work for manufacturers of industrial electric motors, transformers, control equipment, railway locomotives, transit vehicles and other heavy electrical equipment.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

Read more

  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate openings due to growth and retirements not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

  • Estimate 75 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 1460 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. With a small percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are not expected to be a major contributor to employment opportunities over the coming years. Assemblers, Fabricators and Inspectors of Industrial Electrical Motors and Transformers most commonly work full-time hours.

Hourly Pay

N/A

Minimum

N/A

Median

N/A

Maximum

Annual Pay

N/A

Minimum

N/A

Median

N/A

Maximum

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

Hourly Pay

$13.00

Minimum

$23.91

Median

$35.04

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,056

Minimum

$30,111

Median

$70,518

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Industrial electrical motors and transformers assemblers, fabricators and inspectors assemble, make, fit, wire and inspect heavy-duty industrial electrical equipment. They work for manufacturers of industrial electric motors, transformers, control equipment, railway locomotives, transit vehicles and other heavy electrical equipment.

Job duties

Assemblers:

  • Assemble and fit metal and other prefabricated parts to close tolerances according to blueprints to build heavy-duty electric motors or transformers.
  • Assemble stators or armatures for heavy-duty electric motors.
  • Compress steel laminations to build transformer cores.
  • Assemble windings into core using overhead cranes and make electrical connections using crimping, brazing and soldering equipment.
  • Assemble and fit electrical motor or transformer auxiliary equipment like bushings, tap changes, conduit boxes, heating devices, protective equipment and cooling equipment.
  • Set up and adjust production machinery and equipment like coil winding machines for the manufacture of heavy-duty electrical equipment.
  • May do basic tests on electric motors.

Electrical fitters and wirers:

  • Interpret engineering drawings, electrical diagrams and blueprints.
  • Fit motor starters, contactors, capacitors, circuit breakers, voltage regulators, printed circuit boards or other electrical control devices into switchboards and panelboards to make automated processing control equipment, electrical distribution panels, or other industrial electrical control equipment.
  • Wire electrical connections for switchboards and panelboards.
  • Assemble panelboard and switchboard cabinets and install bus bars used to carry heavy electrical current.
  • May operate metal fabricating equipment to fabricate or modify bus bars.

Inspectors:

  • Monitor production and troubleshoot production problems.
  • Check final assembly of electric motors, transformers or control equipment to make sure they meet quality control standards.
  • Collect, record and summarize inspection results.

Sample job titles

  • alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) motor inspector and tester
  • control panel assembler
  • electrical fitter
  • electrical switchgear panel wirer
  • motor and generator assembler and wirer
  • panelboard assembler
  • power transformer assembler
  • switchgear fitter-wirer
  • transformer coil winder
  • transformer inspector

Skills

This work requires excellent spatial perception, form perception, and eye-to-finger coordination. You must be accurate and able to pay close attention to detail. A keen interest in working with machines and routine processes is necessary. You should also be physically fit and have good eyesight and hearing.

Job requirements

  • High school is usually required.
  • College courses in electricity or electro-technology may be required.
  • Several years of on-the-job training are usually provided.
  • Set-up persons, inspectors and leadhands in this group may need experience as an assembler, fitter or wirer in the same company.

Other considerations

Movement to supervisor positions is possible with experience. Self-employment in these jobs is rare, and work is not typically seasonal.

By the numbers

Quick look

< 50

employed in 2016

100.0%

employed full-time

0.0%

self employed

0.0%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
100%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
32.6

median age

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

15,275

employed in 2016

83.2%

employed full-time

3.2%

self employed

27.6%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
72.4%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
44.7

median age

Where will I likely work?

100.0%

Halifax

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

100.0%

Retail trade

What is the age of Employment?

100.0%

25-34

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

24.5%

45-54

20.8%

55-64

19.3%

35-44

16.5%

25-34

15.0%

15-24

Top levels of education

50.0%

High school

N/A
50.0%

Trade Certification

N/A

Compared to: All Manufacturing and Utilities

38.1%

High school

$28,505 median annual income
23.3%

Less than high school

$19,224 median annual income
19.9%

College Diploma

$38,781 median annual income
12.2%

Trade Certification

$43,975 median annual income
4.5%

Bachelor

$39,715 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of electrical, electronics and communication engineers. They include courses in electrical circuitry, prototype development and testing; systems analysis and testing, systems maintenance, instrument calibration, and report preparation.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College - Kingstec Campus

Kentville, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Pictou Campus & School of Fisheries

Stellarton, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Marconi Campus

Sydney, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Ivany Campus

Dartmouth, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

No contacts were found under this occupation profile

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.