Other Trades Helpers and Labourers

(NOC 7612)

in All Trades and Transportation

Other trades helpers and labourers help skilled tradespersons and perform labouring activities in the installation, maintenance and repair of industrial machinery, refrigeration, heating and air conditioning equipment, in the maintenance and repair of transportation and heavy equipment, in the installation and repair of telecommunication and power cables and in other repair and service work settings. They work for a wide variety of manufacturing, utility and service companies.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

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  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate openings due to growth and retirements not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

  • Estimate 205 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4385 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Other Trades Helpers and Labourers most commonly work full-time hours.

The median employment income for 36% of Other Trades Helpers and Labourers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $49,328. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$13.00

Minimum

$17.00

Median

$24.78

Maximum

Annual Pay

$2,033

Minimum

$21,435

Median

$67,901

Maximum

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

Hourly Pay

$13.50

Minimum

$27.25

Median

$35.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,580

Minimum

$37,269

Median

$79,787

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Other trades helpers and labourers help skilled tradespersons and perform labouring activities in the installation, maintenance and repair of industrial machinery, refrigeration, heating and air conditioning equipment, in the maintenance and repair of transportation and heavy equipment, in the installation and repair of telecommunication and power cables and in other repair and service work settings. They work for a wide variety of manufacturing, utility and service companies.

Job duties

Other trades helpers and labourers:

  • Move tools, equipment and other materials to and from work areas.
  • Help splice overhead and underground communications and electric power transmission cables.
  • Help repair, maintain, and install industrial machinery and equipment.
  • Help repair, maintain and install refrigeration, heating and air conditioning equipment.
  • Help repair, maintain and install elevators.
  • Help repair and maintain stationary electric power generating and distribution equipment.
  • Help with mechanical, electrical and body repairs of aircraft, railway cars, cars, trucks, buses, heavy equipment and motorcycles.
  • Help repair electrical appliances, small engines or other similar equipment.
  • Mix fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides and load mixture into airplane for aerial spraying.
  • Help in land surveying activities like holding or moving stakes and rods, clearing brush and debris from line of survey and transporting surveying tools to work area.
  • Carry out other labouring and elemental tasks as required.

Sample job titles

  • aerial spraying assistant
  • air conditioning mechanic helper
  • aircraft mechanic helper
  • cable installer helper
  • diesel mechanic helper
  • ground worker - telecommunications
  • mechanic's helper - automotive
  • millwright helper
  • refrigeration mechanic helper
  • splicer helper - telecommunications
  • surveyor helper

Skills

You need good health, physical stamina and strength. Agility, coordination, and a mechanical ability would be helpful. You must be able to take direction and be able to follow instructions given by a supervisor.

Job requirements

  • Some high school may be required.
  • On-the-job training is provided.

Other considerations

Most trades helpers and labourers work full-time, but often for only part of the year because this work is highly seasonal. There is little or no movement between jobs in this group.

By the numbers

Quick look

280

employed in 2016

71.4%

employed full-time

10.7%

self employed

5.4%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
94.6%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
40.2

median age

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

57,925

employed in 2016

85.9%

employed full-time

11.8%

self employed

5.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
94.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
46.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

36.4%

Halifax

20.0%

Annapolis Valley

20.0%

North Shore

14.5%

Cape Breton

9.1%

Southern

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

43.2%

Construction

13.5%

Manufacturing

10.8%

Other services (except public administration)

10.8%

Professional, scientific and technical services

5.4%

Retail trade

What is the age of Employment?

31.0%

15-24

24.0%

55-64

20.0%

45-54

11.0%

25-34

11.0%

35-44

4.0%

65+

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

24.4%

45-54

22.1%

55-64

17.7%

35-44

17.7%

25-34

10.9%

15-24

Top levels of education

39.3%

High school

$12,972 median annual income
32.1%

Less than high school

$14,430 median annual income
14.3%

Apprenticeship

$56,112 median annual income
12.5%

College Diploma

N/A
3.6%

Bachelor

N/A

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

29.2%

Apprenticeship

$46,494 median annual income
25.5%

High school

$31,260 median annual income
22.3%

College Diploma

$42,050 median annual income
18.7%

Less than high school

$28,319 median annual income
2.8%

Bachelor

$30,527 median annual income

Education & training

Adult high school/secondary diploma programs

This program is typically offered at the high school level.

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Siège Social: 1695, Route 1

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS B0W 1M0

(902) 769-2114

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

PO Box 220

Halifax, NS B3J 2M4

(866) 679-6722

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

No contacts were found under this occupation profile

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.

Job postings

There are currently no job postings for this occupation.