Amusement, Recreation, and Sport Operators and Attendants

(NOC 6722)

in All Sales and Service

Amusement, recreation and sport operators and attendants collect tickets and fees and supervise the use of recreational and sports equipment. They work at amusement parks, fairs, exhibitions, carnivals, arenas, billiard parlours, bowling alleys, golf courses, ski centres, tennis clubs, campgrounds and other recreation and sports facilities.

Job Outlook

average

Read more

  • Estimate Strong growth employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 60 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate Moderate rate of unemployment in 2022

Compared to: All Sales and Service

  • Estimate 10325 employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 17495 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a moderate sized occupation in Nova Scotia so some job opportunities may occur through turnover. The number employed in this occupation is expected to grow significantly over the next few years, which will provide additional opportunities for employment. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Operators and Attendants in Amusement, Recreation, and Sport may either be working full-time or part-time hours.

Hourly Pay

$13.35

Minimum

$13.35

Median

$25.00

Maximum

Annual Pay

$1,503

Minimum

$9,126

Median

$33,763

Maximum

Compared to: All Sales and Service

Hourly Pay

$12.95

Minimum

$15.00

Median

$25.60

Maximum

Annual Pay

$2,949

Minimum

$16,629

Median

$45,086

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Amusement, recreation and sport operators and attendants collect tickets and fees and supervise the use of recreational and sports equipment. They work at amusement parks, fairs, exhibitions, carnivals, arenas, billiard parlours, bowling alleys, golf courses, ski centres, tennis clubs, campgrounds and other recreation and sports facilities.

Job duties

Amusement attraction operators:

  • Drive trucks, vans and other vehicles to transport amusement rides, games and other attractions to amusement sites.
  • Set up rides, fun houses, game concessions and other attractions.
  • Carry out routine maintenance and safety inspections of attraction equipment.
  • Run rides and other attractions, oversee game activities and make sure participants are safe.
  • May sell tickets.

Attendants in amusement, recreation and sport:

  • Collect tickets and fees and rent or sell sports and accessory equipment.
  • Schedule the use of recreational facilities like golf courses, tennis courts, bowling alleys, fitness clubs, campgrounds and other similar facilities.
  • Run equipment like ski lifts, ice rink equipment and snow making machines.
  • Help customers on and off ski lifts and amusement park rides, secure and release safety belts and bars and monitor equipment to find wear and damage.
  • Clean and maintain recreational facilities and grounds.

Sample job titles

  • amusement park attendant
  • amusement ride operator
  • athletic equipment custodian
  • bingo hall attendant
  • bowling alley attendant
  • campground attendant
  • game concession operator
  • park receptionist
  • recreation attendant
  • recreational facility attendant
  • rink ice maker
  • ski lift attendant
  • sports attendant
  • zamboni driver

Skills

  • You should have good health, physical stamina, and manual dexterity. You must also be able to work on your own and follow instructions given by a supervisor.

Job requirements

  • Some high school education may be required.
  • On-the-job training is usually provided.

Other considerations

  • Work in these jobs tends to be seasonal. Workers are often expected to work evenings, weekends, and holidays.

By the numbers

Quick look

1,060

employed in 2016

51.9%

employed full-time

0.9%

self employed

36.8%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
63.2%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
28.2

median age

Compared to: All Sales and Service

102,605

employed in 2016

56.4%

employed full-time

5.8%

self employed

60.1%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
39.9%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
37

median age

Where will I likely work?

43.1%

Halifax

$8,274 median annual income
17.1%

North Shore

$14,237 median annual income
16.6%

Cape Breton

$9,622 median annual income
12.3%

Annapolis Valley

$8,713 median annual income
10.9%

Southern

$10,837 median annual income

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

73.2%

Arts, entertainment and recreation

5.4%

Public administration

4.5%

Educational services

3.6%

Accommodation and food services

3.6%

Other services (except public administration)

What is the age of Employment?

46.0%

15-24

13.0%

55-64

13.0%

45-54

9.0%

25-34

9.0%

65+

9.0%

35-44

Compared to: All Sales and Service

30.0%

15-24

17.2%

45-54

17.2%

25-34

16.1%

55-64

13.8%

35-44

Top levels of education

34.4%

High school

$9,015 median annual income
29.7%

Less than high school

$4,918 median annual income
16.5%

College Diploma

$15,970 median annual income
8.5%

Bachelor

$8,434 median annual income
8.5%

Trade Certification

$22,624 median annual income

Compared to: All Sales and Service

39.8%

High school

$15,705 median annual income
19.7%

Less than high school

$9,866 median annual income
19.5%

College Diploma

$20,644 median annual income
9.9%

Bachelor

$21,262 median annual income
8.0%

Trade Certification

$21,234 median annual income

Education & training

High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

Adults without a high school diploma can contact the Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) for tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL oversees adult education programs in Nova Scotia. NSSAL partners with the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations to deliver programs. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Nova Scotia Tourism Talent
Halifax, NS
Nova Scotia Tourism Human Resource Sector Council
Halifax, NS

Additional resources