Casino Workers

(NOC 6533)

in All Sales and Service

Casino workers run gaming tables, help patrons using slot machines, accept keno wagers, pay out winning bets and jackpots and collect losing bets. They work for casinos.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

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  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate openings due to growth and retirements not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Sales and Service

  • Estimate -505 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 6125 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Casino Workers most commonly work full-time hours.

The median employment income for 51% of Casino Workers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $34,287. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$14.00

Minimum

$18.00

Median

$23.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$11,306

Minimum

$30,522

Median

$51,513

Maximum

Compared to: All Sales and Service

Hourly Pay

$12.55

Minimum

$18.36

Median

$22.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$2,949

Minimum

$16,629

Median

$45,086

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Casino workers run gaming tables, help patrons using slot machines, accept keno wagers, pay out winning bets and jackpots and collect losing bets. They work for casinos.

Job duties

Casino workers:

  • Run gaming tables and games like roulette, blackjack, keno, baccarat and poker.
  • Watch and help patrons using slot machines.
  • Explain rules of games to patrons and make sure that rules are followed.
  • Accept keno wagers and issue tickets for selection.
  • Determine winners or announce winning numbers.
  • Calculate and pay out winning bets and jackpots, collect losing bets and maintain related reports.
  • Reload and reset slot machines.
  • May make minor changes or repairs to slot machines.

Sample job titles

  • baccarat croupier
  • blackjack croupier
  • casino dealer
  • casino slot machine attendant
  • counting attendant
  • croupier
  • gambling table dealer
  • guest services representative
  • keno dealer
  • poker croupier
  • roulette croupier

Skills

Casino workers need good vision and hearing. Physical dexterity is needed to run gambling tables and games with cards. You will need to be careful and comfortable with simple calculations to determine winners, collect bets, pay winners, and keep reports. Good communication skills are required to explain rules and make sure that customers follow them, as well as to resolve complaints.

Job requirements

  • High school is usually required.
  • On-the-job training is provided for gaming table dealers.
  • Security clearance is necessary for all casino workers.
  • Casino gaming licences are usually required for all casino employees.

Other considerations

Movement to supervisor positions is possible with experience in all activities related to gaming.

By the numbers

Quick look

185

employed in 2016

81.1%

employed full-time

0.0%

self employed

45.9%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
54.1%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
43.2

median age

Compared to: All Sales and Service

102,605

employed in 2016

56.4%

employed full-time

5.8%

self employed

60.1%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
39.9%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
37

median age

Where will I likely work?

63.9%

Halifax

19.4%

Cape Breton

11.1%

North Shore

5.6%

Annapolis Valley

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

100.0%

Arts, entertainment and recreation

What is the age of Employment?

26.0%

55-64

21.0%

45-54

18.0%

15-24

18.0%

35-44

16.0%

25-34

Compared to: All Sales and Service

30.0%

15-24

17.2%

45-54

17.2%

25-34

16.1%

55-64

13.8%

35-44

Top levels of education

62.2%

High school

$24,391 median annual income
16.2%

College Diploma

N/A
8.1%

Bachelor

N/A
5.4%

Less than high school

N/A
5.4%

Apprenticeship

N/A

Compared to: All Sales and Service

39.8%

High school

$15,705 median annual income
19.7%

Less than high school

$9,866 median annual income
19.5%

College Diploma

$20,644 median annual income
9.9%

Bachelor

$21,262 median annual income
8.0%

Apprenticeship

$21,234 median annual income

Education & training

Adult high school/secondary diploma programs

This program is typically offered at the high school level.

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Siège Social: 1695, Route 1

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS B0W 1M0

(902) 769-2114

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

PO Box 220

Halifax, NS B3J 2M4

(866) 679-6722

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

No contacts were found under this occupation profile

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.

Job postings

There are currently no job postings for this occupation.