Jewellers, Jewellery, and Watch Repairers and Related Workers

(NOC 6344)

in All Sales and Service

Jewellers and workers in related jobs make, assemble, repair and appraise fine jewellery. Watch repairers and related workers repair, clean, adjust and make parts for clocks and watches. They work for jewellery, clock and watch manufacturers and retail stores, in jewellery and watch repair shops or they may be self-employed.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

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  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate openings due to growth and retirements not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Sales and Service

  • Estimate -505 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 6125 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. With a large percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to be a key contributor to employment opportunities over the coming years. Jewellers, Jewellery and Watch Repairers, and Related Workers may either be working full-time or part-time hours. Also, a fair portion of the workforce is self-employed, so having the option to "work for yourself" may appeal to some individuals’ interests/motivations.

The median employment income for 42% of Jewellers, Jewellery and Watch Repairers, and Related Workers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $31,070. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

N/A

Minimum

N/A

Median

N/A

Maximum

Annual Pay

N/A

Minimum

$17,832

Median

N/A

Maximum

Compared to: All Sales and Service

Hourly Pay

$12.55

Minimum

$18.36

Median

$22.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$2,949

Minimum

$16,629

Median

$45,086

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Jewellers and workers in related jobs make, assemble, repair and appraise fine jewellery. Watch repairers and related workers repair, clean, adjust and make parts for clocks and watches. They work for jewellery, clock and watch manufacturers and retail stores, in jewellery and watch repair shops or they may be self-employed.

Job duties

Jewellers and related workers:

  • Make and repair precious and semi-precious metal jewellery like rings, brooches, pendants, bracelets and lockets.
  • Examine, cut, shape and polish diamonds.
  • Examine, cut, shape and polish precious and synthetic gems.
  • Value gemstones and diamonds to distinguish between stones, identify rare specimens and to detect peculiarity affecting stone values.
  • Set precious and semi-precious stones in jewellery mountings, according to specifications.
  • May supervise other jewellers.
  • Jewellers may specialize in certain kinds of jewellery like gold or silver, or in specific operations like fabrication or repair.

Watch repairers:

  • Make or fit parts to make watches and clocks.
  • Examine clocks and watches, take apart and check for defective and crooked parts or rust.
  • Replace or repair worn or broken parts.
  • Test, adjust and regulate timepiece movements.
  • Clean all parts using special cleaning and rinsing solutions and ultrasonic or mechanical cleaning machines to remove dirt and dried greases.
  • May supervise other watch repairers.

Sample job titles

  • clockmaker
  • clock repairer
  • diamond cutter
  • gem cutter
  • gemologist
  • pearl cutter
  • precious stone setter
  • watch repairer

Skills

Jewellers and watch repairers should enjoy working with complicated mechanical and electrical parts. A delicate touch and attention to detail are necessary. You must be patient and capable of accurate and exact work. Good eyesight, motor skills, and hand-eye coordination are also necessary.

Job requirements

  • High school is usually required.
  • A college or other program, or apprenticeship training in watch or jewellery repair or gemology is usually required.
  • Experience as a jewellery, clock or watch assembler may be required.

Other considerations

Movement is possible among the various jewellery roles in this unit group. There is little movement between the jewellery jobs and the watch repairers in this group.

By the numbers

Quick look

95

employed in 2016

52.6%

employed full-time

47.4%

self employed

57.9%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
42.1%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
56.9

median age

Compared to: All Sales and Service

102,605

employed in 2016

56.4%

employed full-time

5.8%

self employed

60.1%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
39.9%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
37

median age

Where will I likely work?

45.0%

Halifax

25.0%

Annapolis Valley

20.0%

North Shore

10.0%

Cape Breton

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

55.6%

Retail trade

22.2%

Other services (except public administration)

11.1%

Manufacturing

11.1%

Wholesale trade

What is the age of Employment?

30.0%

65+

25.0%

45-54

25.0%

55-64

10.0%

25-34

10.0%

35-44

Compared to: All Sales and Service

30.0%

15-24

17.2%

45-54

17.2%

25-34

16.1%

55-64

13.8%

35-44

Top levels of education

42.1%

College Diploma

$17,961 median annual income
15.8%

Bachelor

N/A
15.8%

Less than high school

N/A
10.5%

High school

N/A
10.5%

Master

N/A

Compared to: All Sales and Service

39.8%

High school

$15,705 median annual income
19.7%

Less than high school

$9,866 median annual income
19.5%

College Diploma

$20,644 median annual income
9.9%

Bachelor

$21,262 median annual income
8.0%

Apprenticeship

$21,234 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Siploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Metal and Jewellery Arts

College, Trades, or University Program

These programs prepare students creatively and technically to express emotions, ideas, or inner visions by fashioning art works from gems, other stones, and precious metals. They include courses in gemology; metalsmithing and finishing, stone cutting and polishing, metal and non-metal casting and moulding, electroforming, metal colouring, enamelling, photo etching, lapidary technique and art, design concepts, and personal style development.

Institutions providing this program

NSCAD University

Halifax, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Canadian Jewellers Association
Toronto, ON

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.