Court Clerks

(NOC 1416)

in All Business, Finance, and Administration

Court clerks do support functions in courts of law like calling court to order, preparing court dockets and maintaining exhibits. They work for federal, provincial and city and town courts.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

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  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate openings due to growth and retirements not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

  • Estimate -1305 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4210 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Court Clerks most commonly work full-time hours.

The median employment income for 75% of Court Clerks who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $42,910. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

N/A

Minimum

N/A

Median

N/A

Maximum

Annual Pay

N/A

Minimum

$42,826

Median

N/A

Maximum

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

Hourly Pay

$14.00

Minimum

$27.85

Median

$38.46

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,754

Minimum

$36,515

Median

$70,271

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Court clerks do support functions in courts of law like calling court to order, preparing court dockets and maintaining exhibits. They work for federal, provincial and city and town courts.

Job duties

Court clerks:

  • Call courts of law to order, read charges, take pleas from defendants, swear in witnesses and perform other clerical functions in the courtrooms.
  • Prepare court files, court dockets and other documents.
  • Record main court proceedings, including pleas, names of witnesses, dates, times and rulings.
  • Manage care and custody of court exhibits.
  • Prepare documents for and participate in jury selection.
  • Maintain court office paper and electronic indexes and files on actions taken by court or in response to court decisions.
  • Receive, disburse and account for fines, fees and trust monies.
  • Help the public in court offices.

Sample job titles

  • clerk of process - courts
  • court clerk
  • court clerk-crier
  • courtroom clerk
  • criminal court clerk
  • judicial clerk
  • provincial court clerk
  • youth court clerk

Skills

Good communication and interpersonal skills are important, along with a willingness to learn and adapt to continually changing equipment and software. Your work must be accurate, and you should enjoy repetitive tasks. Familiarity with computer software and other office equipment is needed. You should also be cooperative and able to work as part of a team.

Job requirements

  • High school is usually required. On-the-job training is provided.

Other considerations

The widespread application of computer technology to the duties performed by many clerks means that a solid foundation in computer skills is often necessary for entry into these jobs. Workers should be able to adapt to changes in technology. Some clerical experience may be required. Movement to supervisor or court officer positions is possible with experience and training.

By the numbers

Quick look

60

employed in 2016

75.0%

employed full-time

0.0%

self employed

83.3%
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16.7%
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50.6

median age

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

63,775

employed in 2016

78.4%

employed full-time

6.6%

self employed

73.4%
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26.6%
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47.9

median age

Where will I likely work?

69.2%

Halifax

15.4%

North Shore

15.4%

Southern

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

84.6%

Public administration

15.4%

Arts, entertainment and recreation

What is the age of Employment?

43.0%

45-54

29.0%

55-64

14.0%

25-34

14.0%

35-44

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

26.3%

45-54

22.6%

55-64

19.4%

35-44

16.7%

25-34

7.5%

65+

Top levels of education

41.7%

College Diploma

N/A
33.3%

High school

N/A
25.0%

Bachelor

N/A
16.7%

Diploma Below Bachelor

N/A

Compared to: All Business, Finance, and Administration

33.8%

College Diploma

$36,304 median annual income
23.8%

High school

$32,903 median annual income
22.8%

Bachelor

$41,755 median annual income
5.8%

Trade Certification

$34,807 median annual income
4.9%

Less than high school

$23,174 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Association of Administrative Professionals
Halifax, NS

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.