Trappers and Hunters

(NOC 8442)

in All Farming, Fishing, Forestry, and Mining

This group of jobs is concerned with hunting and trapping wild animals for food, pelts, live sale, and killing unwanted predators. Among other activities, trappers catch designated animals for bounty or other control programs. They also trap live animals to sell, and maintain and repair trapping equipment. Hunters skin dead animals for pelts; treat, pack, and transport pelts to processing plants or to public auctions; and maintain hunting equipment.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

Read more

  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate openings due to growth and retirements not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Farming, Fishing, Forestry, and Mining

  • Estimate Decline slightly employment change, 2017-2019
  • Estimate 910 openings due to growth and retirements, 2017-2019
  • Estimate High rate of unemployment in 2016

This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. With a large percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to be a key contributor to employment opportunities over the coming years. Trappers and Hunters most commonly work part-time hours. Furthermore, the jobs may either be permanent or temporary positions, as both are common.

Hourly Pay

N/A

Minimum

N/A

Median

N/A

Maximum

Annual Pay

N/A

Minimum

N/A

Median

N/A

Maximum

Compared to: All Farming, Fishing, Forestry, and Mining

Hourly Pay

$10.85

Minimum

$16.00

Median

$31.88

Maximum

Annual Pay

$4,009

Minimum

$23,520

Median

$87,170

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

This group of jobs is concerned with hunting and trapping wild animals for food, pelts, live sale, and killing unwanted predators. Among other activities, trappers catch designated animals for bounty or other control programs. They also trap live animals to sell, and maintain and repair trapping equipment. Hunters skin dead animals for pelts; treat, pack, and transport pelts to processing plants or to public auctions; and maintain hunting equipment.

Job duties

Trappers perform some or all of the following duties:

  • Set traps with bait and position traps along trails.
  • Operate snowmobiles or travel on foot, snowshoes or skis to patrol trapline.
  • Remove catch and reset traps and snares.
  • Kill and skin catch for pelts, and treat and pack pelts for marketing.
  • Trap live animals for sale to buyers or for relocation purposes.
  • Maintain and repair trapping equipment.
  • Maintain trails and access to trapping lines.
  • Trap designated animals for bounty or other control programs.
  • May monitor animal population in the trapping regions to ensure future sustainability.

Hunters perform some or all of the following duties:

  • Operate boats or snowmobiles or travel on foot to reach hunting areas.
  • Kill wild animals using firearms or other weapons.
  • Skin dead animals for pelts using knives.
  • Treat, pack and transport pelts to processing plants or to public auctions.
  • Maintain hunting equipment.
  • May monitor animal population in the hunting regions to ensure future sustainability.

Sample job titles

  • beaver trapper
  • fur trapper
  • game trapper
  • hunter
  • seal hunter - hunting and trapping
  • trapper

Skills

For these jobs, you should enjoy working outdoors and being physically active. Good eyesight and health are important. You may be exposed to extreme weather conditions and varying climates. You must be alert, patient, and observant.

Job requirements

  • Completion of trapping or hunting courses may be required in some provinces.
  • A provincial trapping or hunting licence may be required.

Other considerations

Trappers and hunters are usually self-employed and work on a seasonal basis often involving irregular or long hours. In some jurisdictions, trappers may be allocated trapping areas based on their experience.

By the numbers

Quick look

< 50

employed in 2016

N/A

employed full-time

N/A

self employed

N/A
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
100%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
N/A

median age

Compared to: All Farming, Fishing, Forestry, and Mining

14,665

employed in 2016

84.0%

employed full-time

22.0%

self employed

15.1%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
84.9%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
44.6

median age

Where will I likely work?

100.0%

Northern

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

Northern

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

100.0%

Other Industries

Top levels of education

100.0%

High school

$15,036 median annual income

Compared to: All Farming, Fishing, Forestry, and Mining

34.0%

Less than high school

$14,445 median annual income
31.5%

High school

$14,229 median annual income
14.3%

College certificate or diploma

$21,289 median annual income
14.0%

Trades certificate

$19,107 median annual income
4.3%

Bachelor's degree

$15,980 median annual income

Education & training

There is no information to display in this section

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources
PO Box 698
Halifax, NS B3J 2T9
Tel: (902) 424-5935
Fax: (902) 424-7735

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.

Job postings

There are currently no job postings for this occupation.