Other Trades and Related Workers

(NOC 7384)

in All Trades and Transportation

This group includes tradespersons and related skilled workers who repair, service, install, calibrate, or build a variety of products. They work for a wide range of businesses, or they may be self-employed.

Job Outlook

Average

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  • Estimate Decline slightly employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 15 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate High rate of unemployment in 2019

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

  • Estimate 205 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4385 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a moderate sized occupation in Nova Scotia so some job opportunities may occur through turnover. The number employed in this occupation is expected to decline slightly over the next few years, which may affect the number of new opportunities available. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Other Trades and Related Workers most commonly work full-time hours. Also, a fair portion of the workforce is self-employed, so having the option to "work for yourself" may appeal to some individuals’ interests/motivations.

The median employment income for 49% of Other Trades and Related Workers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $47,515. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$18.00

Minimum

$22.50

Median

$30.00

Maximum

Annual Pay

$6,544

Minimum

$41,414

Median

$105,007

Maximum

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

Hourly Pay

$13.50

Minimum

$27.25

Median

$35.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,580

Minimum

$37,269

Median

$79,787

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

This group includes tradespersons and related skilled workers who repair, service, install, calibrate, or build a variety of products. They work for a wide range of businesses, or they may be self-employed.

Job duties

Gunsmiths:

  • Make guns and repair and modify firearms according to blueprints or customers' specifications.

Locksmiths:

  • Repair, install and adjust locks, make keys, and change lock combinations.

Recreation vehicle technicians:

  • Repair or replace electrical wiring, plumbing, propane gas lines, appliances, windows, doors, cabinets, and structural frames in recreational vehicles.

Safe and vault servicers:

  • Install, repair, and maintain safes and vaults in banks and other institutions.

Saw fitters:

  • Repair, set, and sharpen band saws, chain saws, circular saws, and other types of saw blades according to specifications.

Die setters:

  • Select dies for forging according to work order and specifications.
  • Position, align, and bolt dies to ram and anvil of power presses and hammers.

Commercial divers:

  • Complete underwater activities related to construction, inspection, search, salvage, repair, and photography.

Sample job titles

  • blacksmith
  • diver
  • farrier
  • locksmith
  • marine service technician
  • recreation vehicle service technician
  • safe and vault technician
  • saw repairer
  • toolsmith
  • underwater worker

Skills

You will require manual dexterity and good eye-hand coordination to manipulate and use tools and assemble parts. Good near vision is required. Physical strength and agility are needed and some of the jobs within this grouping may also involve heavy lifting. You must have the ability to work systematically and think analytically as workers in these jobs need to be methodical and precise. Communication skills are needed to assess customer requirements and specifications in some of these jobs.

Job requirements

  • High school is usually required.
  • A two- to four-year apprenticeship program in a relevant trade like locksmith, recreation vehicle technician, or saw fitter or college, high school or industry courses combined with several years of related work experience or several years of on-the-job training are required.
  • Trade certification for locksmiths is available, but voluntary, in Nova Scotia.
  • Trade certification for recreation vehicle service technicians is available, but voluntary, in Nova Scotia.
  • Red Seal Endorsement (RSE) is also available to qualified recreation vehicle service technicians upon successful completion of the interprovincial Red Seal examination.
  • Commercial divers must meet the requirements of CSA Standard Z275.4-02, Competency Standard for Diving Operations.
  • Commercial divers require an Occupational Diver Certificate of Competency issued by the Diver Certification Board of Canada (DCBC) or qualification earned through a formal education program, training courses in diving or a combination of education and practical experience.
  • Commercial divers require certification of competency and a diving medical examination from an approved hyperbaric physician.
  • Commercial divers may require military or police diving experience.
  • Commercial divers usually require a provincial blaster's licence for the setting and detonation of explosives.
  • Provincial trade certification or licensing may be required for other jobs in this group.

Other considerations

Movement to supervisory positions is possible with experience.

By the numbers

Quick look

535

employed in 2016

87.9%

employed full-time

21.5%

self employed

11.2%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
88.8%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
42.2

median age

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

57,925

employed in 2016

85.9%

employed full-time

11.8%

self employed

5.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
94.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
46.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

43.0%

Halifax

19.6%

Annapolis Valley

15.0%

North Shore

12.1%

Southern

10.3%

Cape Breton

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

19.0%

Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services

19.0%

Public administration

15.2%

Retail trade

13.9%

Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting

6.3%

Manufacturing

What is the age of Employment?

25.0%

45-54

22.0%

25-34

18.0%

35-44

13.0%

15-24

13.0%

55-64

8.0%

65+

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

24.4%

45-54

22.1%

55-64

17.7%

35-44

17.7%

25-34

10.9%

15-24

Top levels of education

30.6%

High school

$37,854 median annual income
25.0%

College Diploma

$55,133 median annual income
23.1%

Apprenticeship

$45,953 median annual income
13.0%

Less than high school

$31,491 median annual income
4.6%

Bachelor

N/A

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

29.2%

Apprenticeship

$46,494 median annual income
25.5%

High school

$31,260 median annual income
22.3%

College Diploma

$42,050 median annual income
18.7%

Less than high school

$28,319 median annual income
2.8%

Bachelor

$30,527 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Siploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Agricultural and Domestic Animal Services

College, Trades, or University Program

This includes any program that relates to Agricultural and Domestic Animal Services like animal grooming, pet training, equine studies, and taxidermy.

Institutions providing this program

Maritime Farrier School

Truro, NS

Locksmithing

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to make, repair, maintain, modify, and open locks, to make keys, to enter and change lock and safe combinations, and install and repair safes.

Institutions providing this program

Apprenticeship Training

Halifax, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

Regulations

Locksmith (INACTIVE)

Trade Inactive: This trade is currently inactive in Nova Scotia.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
1256 Barrington Street, 3rd Fl, Box 578
Halifax, NS B3J 2S9
(800) 494-5651
Marine Service Technician

Certificate of Qualification (Voluntary): This job is a designated trade in Nova Scotia. Employers may require certification, but a certificate is not needed to legally do this work.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
1256 Barrington Street, 3rd Fl, Box 578
Halifax, NS B3J 2S9
(800) 494-5651
Recreation Vehicle Service Technician

Certificate of Qualification (Voluntary): This job is a designated trade in Nova Scotia. Employers may require certification, but a certificate is not needed to legally do this work.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
1256 Barrington Street, 3rd Fl, Box 578
Halifax, NS B3J 2S9
(800) 494-5651

Contacts

Forestry Safety Society of Nova Scotia
Truro, NS
Nova Scotia Department of Labour and Advanced Education, Occupational Diving Regulations
Halifax, NS
Canadian Working Divers Institute
Chapleau, ON
Diver Certification Board of Canada
Upper Tantallon, NS
Association of Diving Contractors International
Houston, TX - USA