Elevator Constructors and Mechanics

(NOC 7318)

in All Trades and Transportation

Elevator constructors and mechanics install, modify, service, repair, and test electric and hydraulic elevators, personnel hoists, moving walkways, stage lifts, escalators, and related equipment. They work for elevator construction and maintenance companies.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

Read more

  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate 0 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

  • Estimate 4040 employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 8425 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

Outlook: undetermined - an outlook was not determined for this occupation due to too few workers in Nova Scotia.
Demand: A small number of positions will become available due to retirements.
Work hours: full-time, usually. Jobs are typically permanent positions.

Hourly Pay

N/A

Minimum

N/A

Median

N/A

Maximum

Annual Pay

N/A

Minimum

$90,995

Median

N/A

Maximum

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

Hourly Pay

$15.00

Minimum

$24.00

Median

$37.00

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,580

Minimum

$37,269

Median

$79,787

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Elevator constructors and mechanics install, modify, service, repair, and test electric and hydraulic elevators, personnel hoists, moving walkways, stage lifts, escalators, and related equipment. They work for elevator construction and maintenance companies.

Job duties

Elevator constructors and mechanics:

  • Read and interpret blueprints to determine layout of system components.
  • Perform preparatory construction work including steel work, wiring, and piping.
  • Install elevators, escalators, moving walkways, dumbwaiters, and related equipment according to specifications.
  • Connect car frames to counterweights with cables and assemble elevator cars.
  • Install and wire electric and electronic control system devices.
  • Install, test, and adjust safety control devices.
  • Test operation of newly installed equipment.
  • Troubleshoot electrical or mechanical systems failures.
  • Disassemble defective units and repair or replace worn or suspect parts.
  • Adjust valves, ratchets, seals, brake linings and other components.
  • Carry out preventative maintenance programs to ensure public safety.

Sample job titles

  • apprentice elevator mechanic
  • elevator constructor-mechanic
  • elevator installer
  • elevator mechanic
  • elevator repairer
  • escalator installer-repairer
  • escalator repairer

Skills

  • Mechanical aptitude
  • Ability to work well in a small crew without direct supervision
  • Ability to do detailed and precise work
  • Good vision and hearing
  • Hand-eye coordination
  • Agility and strength

Job requirements

  • High school or equivalent (usually).
  • Training through a four-level Class A, 7,200-hour or two-level Class B, 3,600-hour apprenticeship program: to become an apprentice you first need to have a job - enter an apprenticeship agreement either directly through an employer or after graduating from a college-level pre-apprenticeship program; learn on the job, mentored by a certified journeyperson who signs off on skills in a logbook.
  • Trade Qualifier option, 10,800 hours Class A or 5,400 hours Class B and other criteria.
  • Obtain an Elevator Mechanic licence from Technical Safety.

Other considerations

  • Class A mechanics work on all classes of elevating devices except passenger ropeways. Class B mechanics work on barrier-free lifts and are restricted to stair chair lifts, stair platform lifts, and vertical platform lifts.
  • Technical training is available through the Canadian Elevator Industry Education Program.
  • Elevator constructors and mechanics work indoors most of the time but may do some outdoor work.
  • They usually work a 40-hour workweek. Those who do maintenance and service may be on 24-hour call at times.
  • There is some risk of injury working with heavy equipment and from falls and electrical shocks.
  • Experienced elevator constructors and mechanics may become crew supervisors.
  • Elevator constructors and mechanics may specialize in construction, maintenance, or repair.

By the numbers

Quick look

110

employed in 2016

100.0%

employed full-time

19.0%

self employed

0.0%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
100%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
45.8

median age

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

57,925

employed in 2016

85.9%

employed full-time

11.8%

self employed

5.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
94.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
46.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

68.2%

Halifax

$91,677 median annual income
13.6%

Annapolis Valley

N/A
9.1%

Southern

N/A
9.1%

North Shore

N/A

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

100.0%

Construction

What is the age of Employment?

52.0%

45-54

19.0%

25-34

19.0%

35-44

10.0%

55-64

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

24.4%

45-54

22.1%

55-64

17.7%

35-44

17.7%

25-34

10.9%

15-24

Top levels of education

54.5%

College Diploma

$90,662 median annual income
40.9%

Trade Certification

$97,688 median annual income
9.1%

Bachelor

N/A

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

29.2%

Trade Certification

$46,494 median annual income
25.5%

High school

$31,260 median annual income
22.3%

College Diploma

$42,050 median annual income
18.7%

Less than high school

$28,319 median annual income
2.8%

Bachelor

$30,527 median annual income

Education & training

High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

Adults without a high school diploma can contact the Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) for tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL oversees adult education programs in Nova Scotia. NSSAL partners with the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations to deliver programs. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

Regulations

Elevating Device Mechanic A/B

Right to Practice: This job is regulated in Nova Scotia. A licence shows that the holder has met provincial requirements and is required to legally do this work.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Department of Labour, Skills and Immigration, Technical Safety Division
Halifax, NS

Contacts

Nova Scotia Department of Labour, Skills and Immigration, Occupational Health and Safety Division
Halifax, NS
Nova Scotia Construction Sector Council
Halifax, NS
Canadian Elevator Industry Educational Program
Pickering, ON

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.