Telecommunications Installation and Repair Workers

(NOC 7246)

in All Trades and Transportation

Telecommunications installation and repair workers install, test, repair, and maintain telecommunication systems. They work for telephone and other telecommunications transmission services companies.

Job Outlook

average

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  • Estimate Weak growth employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 15 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate Low rate of unemployment in 2022

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

  • Estimate 4040 employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 8425 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

Size of the occupation in Nova Scotia: medium, with occasional job opportunities.
Demand: Employment growth will lead to a few new positions. Some positions will become available due to employee turnover. There are a small number of unemployed workers with recent experience in this occupation. A moderate number of positions will become available due to retirements.
Work hours: full-time, usually.

Hourly Pay

$20.00

Minimum

$28.00

Median

$35.00

Maximum

Annual Pay

$17,213

Minimum

$63,749

Median

$84,214

Maximum

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

Hourly Pay

$15.00

Minimum

$24.00

Median

$37.00

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,580

Minimum

$37,269

Median

$79,787

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Telecommunications installation and repair workers install, test, repair, and maintain telecommunication systems. They work for telephone and other telecommunications transmission services companies.

Job duties

Telephone installers and repairers:

  • Install, arrange, remove and maintain telephone equipment, wiring and related hardware.
  • Test installed telephone systems to find transmission faults.
  • Repair or replace broken telephones, wire and related equipment.

Switch network installers and repairers:

  • Install electromechanical, analog and digital trunking systems, circuits and equipment in telecommunications central offices and switching centres.
  • Inspect and test trunking systems, circuits and equipment.
  • Examine test results and adjust, change or repair switching system, network, related equipment and software.

Telecommunications service testers:

  • Run computerized testing systems to carry out service tests on customer lines and equipment.
  • Determine the nature, cause and location of service trouble.
  • Dispatch correct repair workers.
  • Complete test reports and maintain test and service records.
  • May help repair personnel to test lines, circuits and systems, isolate and clear cable faults and verify records.

Telecommunications equipment technicians:

  • Install, remove and maintain telecommunications equipment and related systems like telex and fax machines, teletypewriters, mobile radios, cellular telephones, pagers and other telecommunications equipment.
  • Configure operating systems and install software for access to the Internet.
  • Inspect and test operation of telecommunications equipment.
  • Identify and find equipment faults, and change, replace or repair telecommunications equipment.

Sample job titles

  • apprentice communication technician - switching
  • cellular telephone technician
  • communications technician
  • exchange tester - telecommunications
  • mobile radio installer
  • private branch exchange (PBX) installer
  • switch network installer and repairer
  • telecommunications equipment technician
  • telephone installer
  • telephone line and station installer

Skills

  • Analytical and mechanical abilities
  • Math skills
  • Communication and interpersonal skills
  • The ability to work and solve problems independently
  • Good colour vision, manual dexterity, and hand-eye coordination
  • The ability to climb poles and ladders while carrying tools and equipment

Job requirements

  • High school or equivalent (usually).
  • Telephone and switch network installers and repairers need a combination of over three years of work experience in the trade and some high school, college or industry-related courses.
  • Communication technicians usually need a college electrical and electronics program and several months of on-the-job training, or training through a 3,600-hour apprenticeship program with two apprenticeship levels: to become an apprentice you first need to have a job - enter an apprenticeship agreement either directly through an employer or after graduating from a college-level pre-apprenticeship program; learn on the job, mentored by a certified journeyperson who signs off on skills in a logbook.
  • Trade Qualifier option, 5,400 hours, and other criteria.
  • Certification for communication technicians is voluntary in Nova Scotia.
  • To work in the Communications Technician trade, an individual requires a license under the regulatory authority in Nova Scotia, the Technical Safety Division.
  • Experience as an installer and repairer (telephone and switch network) is usually required for service testers.

Other considerations

  • Communications technicians install, repair, upgrade, and maintain communication cables. They i) create the design and layout of the system or any part of the system, ii) and install communications cabling supports, except cable trades, conduits, or wire ways, and iii) bonding any communications equipment to the main electrical ground system.
  • Working conditions vary considerably in this occupation. Communication technicians may work indoors or outdoors and often travel to several work sites in a day.
  • They generally work a standard 35- to 40-hour week but may have to work overtime, particularly when weather conditions or other events disrupt cable or telephone service. Shift work may be required.
  • Stringing cable from utility poles may involve climbing and balancing on an aerial platform or pole in all types of weather.
  • Risks include injury from electrical shocks, falls, or hazards associated with cable splicing.
  • Changes in telecommunications and multi-media technology and the ways in which they are delivered to customers may affect the type of work performed and job prospects in these jobs. Changes in technology, like high-speed Internet and digital phone services, require that workers in this group continuously upgrade their skills.
  • Experienced communication technicians may advance to supervisory positions such as foreman, superintendent or quality assurance. They may retrain and transfer to other departments such as sales, engineering or systems design, or become an estimator.

By the numbers

Quick look

570

employed in 2016

95.6%

employed full-time

4.4%

self employed

6.1%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
93.9%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
43

median age

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

57,925

employed in 2016

85.9%

employed full-time

11.8%

self employed

5.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
94.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
46.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

53.5%

Halifax

$66,140 median annual income
15.8%

Annapolis Valley

$67,138 median annual income
12.3%

North Shore

$52,424 median annual income
9.6%

Southern

$66,244 median annual income
8.8%

Cape Breton

$61,984 median annual income

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

64.0%

Information and cultural industries

17.0%

Construction

7.0%

Public administration

5.0%

Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services

3.0%

Wholesale trade

What is the age of Employment?

28.0%

45-54

26.0%

35-44

23.0%

25-34

15.0%

55-64

7.0%

15-24

2.0%

65+

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

24.4%

45-54

22.1%

55-64

17.7%

35-44

17.7%

25-34

10.9%

15-24

Top levels of education

47.4%

College Diploma

$68,299 median annual income
21.9%

High school

$42,796 median annual income
14.0%

Trade Certification

$64,963 median annual income
6.1%

Less than high school

$41,336 median annual income
5.3%

Bachelor

$56,038 median annual income

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

29.2%

Trade Certification

$46,494 median annual income
25.5%

High school

$31,260 median annual income
22.3%

College Diploma

$42,050 median annual income
18.7%

Less than high school

$28,319 median annual income
2.8%

Bachelor

$30,527 median annual income

Education & training

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of electrical, electronics and communication engineers. They include courses in electrical circuitry, prototype development and testing; systems analysis and testing, systems maintenance, instrument calibration, and report preparation.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

Adults without a high school diploma can contact the Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) for tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL oversees adult education programs in Nova Scotia. NSSAL partners with the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations to deliver programs. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

Regulations

Communications Technician

Licence: A licence is required to work in the communications technician trade.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Department of Labour, Skills and Immigration, Technical Safety Division
Halifax, NS
Communications Technician

Certificate of Qualification (Voluntary): This is a designated trade in Nova Scotia. Employers may require certification, but a certificate is not needed to legally work in this trade.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
Halifax, NS
No contacts were found under this occupation profile

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.