Telecommunications Installation and Repair Workers

(NOC 7246)

in All Trades and Transportation

Telecommunications installation and repair workers install, test, maintain and repair telephones, telephone switching equipment and telecommunications equipment including fibre optics, microwave, radio and satellite. They work for telephone and other telecommunications transmission services companies.

Job Outlook

Average

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  • Estimate Decline slightly employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 25 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate Moderate rate of unemployment in 2019

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

  • Estimate 205 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4385 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a moderate sized occupation in Nova Scotia so some job opportunities may occur through turnover. The number employed in this occupation is expected to decline slightly over the next few years, which may affect the number of new opportunities available. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Telecommunications Installation and Repair Workers most commonly work full-time hours.

The median employment income for 75% of Telecommunications Installation and Repair Workers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $66,847. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$20.00

Minimum

$31.00

Median

$32.97

Maximum

Annual Pay

$17,213

Minimum

$63,749

Median

$84,214

Maximum

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

Hourly Pay

$13.50

Minimum

$27.25

Median

$35.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,580

Minimum

$37,269

Median

$79,787

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Telecommunications installation and repair workers install, test, maintain and repair telephones, telephone switching equipment and telecommunications equipment including fibre optics, microwave, radio and satellite. They work for telephone and other telecommunications transmission services companies.

Job duties

Telephone installers and repairers:

  • Install, arrange, remove and maintain telephone equipment, wiring and related hardware.
  • Test installed telephone systems to find transmission faults.
  • Repair or replace broken telephones, wire and related equipment.

Switch network installers and repairers:

  • Install electromechanical, analog and digital trunking systems, circuits and equipment in telecommunications central offices and switching centres.
  • Inspect and test trunking systems, circuits and equipment.
  • Examine test results and adjust, change or repair switching system, network, related equipment and software.

Telecommunications service testers:

  • Run computerized testing systems to carry out service tests on customer lines and equipment.
  • Determine the nature, cause and location of service trouble.
  • Dispatch correct repair workers.
  • Complete test reports and maintain test and service records.
  • May help repair personnel to test lines, circuits and systems, isolate and clear cable faults and verify records.

Telecommunications equipment technicians:

  • Install, remove and maintain telecommunications equipment and related systems like telex and fax machines, teletypewriters, mobile radios, cellular telephones, pagers and other telecommunications equipment.
  • Configure operating systems and install software for access to the Internet.
  • Inspect and test operation of telecommunications equipment.
  • Identify and find equipment faults, and change, replace or repair telecommunications equipment.

Sample job titles

  • apprentice communication technician - switching
  • cellular telephone technician
  • exchange tester - telecommunications
  • mobile radio installer
  • private branch exchange (PBX) installer
  • switch network installer and repairer
  • telecommunications equipment technician
  • telephone communicationt technician
  • telephone installer
  • telephone line and station installer

Skills

This work requires a good mechanical and electrical aptitude. You should have a strong background in mathematics and the sciences. Accuracy and a keen eye for detail are important. Good eyesight, colour vision, and hand-eye coordination are necessary.

Job requirements

  • High school is required.
  • Telephone and switch network installers and repairers need to finish an apprenticeship program ranging from three to four years or a combination of over three years work experience in the trade and some high school, college or industry related courses.
  • Telecommunications equipment technicians usually need a college electrical and electronics program and several months of on-the-job training or completion of a three- or four-year apprenticeship training program.
  • Voluntary trade certification for communication technicians is available in Nova Scotia.
  • Experience as an installer and repairer (telephone and switch network) is usually required for service testers.

Other considerations

Movement to supervisory positions is possible with experience. Changes in telecommunications and multi-media technology and the ways in which they are delivered to customers may affect the type of work performed and job prospects in these jobs. Changes in technology, like high-speed Internet and digital phone services, require that workers in this group continuously upgrade their skills.

By the numbers

Quick look

570

employed in 2016

95.6%

employed full-time

4.4%

self employed

6.1%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
93.9%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
43

median age

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

57,925

employed in 2016

85.9%

employed full-time

11.8%

self employed

5.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
94.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
46.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

53.5%

Halifax

15.8%

Annapolis Valley

12.3%

North Shore

9.6%

Southern

8.8%

Cape Breton

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

64.0%

Information and cultural industries

17.0%

Construction

7.0%

Public administration

5.0%

Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services

3.0%

Wholesale trade

What is the age of Employment?

28.0%

45-54

26.0%

35-44

23.0%

25-34

15.0%

55-64

7.0%

15-24

2.0%

65+

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

24.4%

45-54

22.1%

55-64

17.7%

35-44

17.7%

25-34

10.9%

15-24

Top levels of education

47.4%

College certificate or diploma

$68,299 median annual income
21.9%

High school

$42,796 median annual income
14.0%

Trades certificate

$64,963 median annual income
6.1%

Less than high school

$41,336 median annual income
5.3%

Bachelor's degree

$56,038 median annual income

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

29.2%

Trades certificate

$46,494 median annual income
25.5%

High school

$31,260 median annual income
22.3%

College certificate or diploma

$42,050 median annual income
18.7%

Less than high school

$28,319 median annual income
2.8%

Bachelor's degree

$30,527 median annual income

Education & training

Adult high school/secondary diploma programs

This program is typically offered at the high school level.

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Siège Social: 1695, Route 1

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS B0W 1M0

(902) 769-2114

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

PO Box 220

Halifax, NS B3J 2M4

(866) 679-6722

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Electrical, electronic and communications engineering technology/technician

This program is typically offered at the trades/college level.

This instructional program class includes any program that prepares individuals to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of electrical, electronics and communication engineers. These programs include courses in electrical circuitry, prototype development and testing; systems analysis and testing, systems maintenance, instrument calibration, and report preparation.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College - Cumberland Campus

PO Box 550, 1 Main Street

Springhill, NS B0M 1X0

(902) 597-3737

Nova Scotia Community College - Kingstec Campus

236 Belcher Street

Kentville, NS B4N 0A6

(902) 678-7341

Nova Scotia Community College - Pictou Campus & School of Fisheries

PO Box 820, 39 Acadia Avenue

Stellarton, NS B0K 1S0

(902) 752-2002

Nova Scotia Community College - Marconi Campus

PO Box 1042, 1240 Grand Lake Road

Sydney, NS B1P 6J7

(902) 563-2450

Nova Scotia Community College - Ivany Campus

80 Mawiomi Place

Dartmouth, NS B2Y 0A5

(902) 491-1100

Employment requirements & contacts

Regulations

Communications Cabling Specialist (CCS)

Certificate: Installation of communications cabling requires a permit unless exempt per regulations. CCS certificate required to obtain a permit and to perform work that is exempt from permit. Communications cabling permits are issued from the local electrical inspection department.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Department of Labour and Advanced Education, Technical Safety Division
5151 Terminal Road, 6th floor, PO Box 697
Halifax, NS B3J 2T8
(844) 424-3200
(902) 424-3239
Communications Technician

Trade Inactive: This trade is currently inactive in Nova Scotia. NOTE: The trade is currently regulated by LAE-Technical Safety as a Communications Cabling Specialist - see below

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
2021 Brunswick Street, PO Box 578
Halifax, NS B3J 2S9
(800) 494-5651
(902) 424-0717
No contacts were found under this occupation profile

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.

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