Telecommunications Line and Cable Workers

(NOC 7245)

in All Trades and Transportation

Telecommunications line and cable workers install, repair, and maintain telecommunication lines and cables. They work for cable television companies and telephone and other telecommunications services.

Job Outlook

Average

Read more

  • Estimate Moderate growth employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 30 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate Moderate rate of unemployment in 2019

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

  • Estimate 205 employment change, 2019-2021
  • Estimate 4385 openings due to growth and retirements, 2018-2020
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “average”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is comparable to the average for all occupations in Nova Scotia. This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. The number employed in this occupation is expected to grow moderately over the next few years, which will likely provide some additional opportunities for employment. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Telecommunications Line and Cable Workers most commonly work full-time hours.

The median employment income for 64% of Telecommunications Line and Cable Workers who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $49,041. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$13.00

Minimum

$30.70

Median

$32.97

Maximum

Annual Pay

$14,294

Minimum

$43,118

Median

$70,513

Maximum

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

Hourly Pay

$13.50

Minimum

$27.25

Median

$35.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,580

Minimum

$37,269

Median

$79,787

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Telecommunications line and cable workers install, repair, and maintain telecommunication lines and cables. They work for cable television companies and telephone and other telecommunications services.

Job duties

Telecommunications line and cable workers:

  • Install, remove, maintain, and repair aerial and underground telephone and other telecommunication transmission and distribution lines, cables, and associated hardware.
  • Install (but do not repair or maintain) cable television lines and cables.
  • Splice and repair various types and sizes of telephone and other telecommunication cables including single line, coaxial and fibre optic.
  • Inspect and test telecommunication transmission lines and cables for transmission characteristics and to locate faults.
  • Analyze and record test results.
  • Climb and work on poles, ladders or other support structures or work in confined spaces like trenches, tunnels, and crawl spaces.
  • Communicate with other workers to coordinate the preparation and completion of work assignments.
  • Help in construct and remove telecommunication poles, towers, and associated support structures.
  • May use excavation machinery and other heavy equipment.

Sample job titles

  • cable installer - telecommunications
  • cable repair technician - telecommunications
  • communications technician
  • lineworker-technician - telecommunications
  • repair lineman/woman - telecommunications
  • telecommunication cable installer
  • telecommunication cable repairer
  • telecommunication line technician

Skills

This work requires accuracy, caution, and attention to detail. You must be able to work to precise specifications and levels of safety when installing and repairing cables. Physical stamina, good hand-eye coordination, and an electrical aptitude are needed. You should also have a strong background in mathematics and the sciences.

Job requirements

  • High school is required.
  • A four-year telecommunications line and cable apprenticeship program or a combination of over three years work experience in the trade and some industry-related or other specialized courses or completion of a two-year college program in electronics is usually required.

Other considerations

Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.

By the numbers

Quick look

380

employed in 2016

90.9%

employed full-time

0.0%

self employed

3.9%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
96.1%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
41.9

median age

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

57,925

employed in 2016

85.9%

employed full-time

11.8%

self employed

5.3%
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94.7%
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46.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

46.1%

Halifax

19.7%

North Shore

18.4%

Cape Breton

7.9%

Southern

7.9%

Annapolis Valley

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

54.8%

Information and cultural industries

32.3%

Construction

3.2%

Professional, scientific and technical services

3.2%

Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services

3.2%

Manufacturing

What is the age of Employment?

24.0%

45-54

22.0%

25-34

21.0%

35-44

21.0%

55-64

12.0%

15-24

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

24.4%

45-54

22.1%

55-64

17.7%

35-44

17.7%

25-34

10.9%

15-24

Top levels of education

32.9%

High school

$40,582 median annual income
31.6%

College Diploma

$53,281 median annual income
18.4%

Trade Certification

$49,157 median annual income
9.2%

Less than high school

N/A
5.3%

Bachelor

N/A

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

29.2%

Trade Certification

$46,494 median annual income
25.5%

High school

$31,260 median annual income
22.3%

College Diploma

$42,050 median annual income
18.7%

Less than high school

$28,319 median annual income
2.8%

Bachelor

$30,527 median annual income

Education & training

Adult High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

The Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) administers, coordinates, and supports the development and delivery of adult education programs through learning partners in Nova Scotia. Our learning partners include the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations that offer tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED, empowering Nova Scotians to achieve their learning and employment goals.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College - Adult Learning

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Lineworker

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to install, operate, maintain and repair local, long-distance, and rural electric power cables and communication lines; erect and construct pole and tower lines; and install underground lines and cables. They include courses in cable installation and repair, fibre-optic technology, trenching, mobile equipment and crane operation, high-voltage installations, maintenance and inspection, safety, remote communications, and applicable codes and standards.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College - Cumberland Campus

Springhill, NS

Apprenticeship Training

Halifax, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

No contacts were found under this occupation profile

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.