Industrial Electricians

(NOC 7242)

in All Trades and Transportation

Industrial electricians install, maintain, test, troubleshoot and repair industrial electrical equipment and associated electrical and electronic controls. They work for electrical contractors and maintenance departments of factories, plants, mines, shipyards and other industrial businesses.

Job Outlook

Good

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  • Estimate Strong growth employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 125 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate Moderate rate of unemployment in 2022

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

  • Estimate 4040 employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 8425 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

The employment outlook over the next few years for this occupational group is “good”, which indicates the chances of a qualified individual finding work is better than average when compared to other occupations in Nova Scotia. This is a fairly large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities occur fairly regularly. The number employed in this occupation is expected to grow significantly over the next few years, which will provide additional opportunities for employment. With a moderate percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to contribute somewhat to employment opportunities over the coming years. Industrial Electricians most commonly work full-time hours. Furthermore, the jobs may either be permanent or temporary positions, as both are common. With employment conditions being somewhat seasonal, periods of downtime or layoff throughout the year affect some workers. Also, a average portion of the workforce is self-employed, so having the option to "work for yourself" may appeal to some individuals’ interests/motivations.

The median employment income for 41% of Industrial Electricians who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $73,141. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$20.00

Minimum

$32.00

Median

$39.80

Maximum

Annual Pay

$25,547

Minimum

$69,719

Median

$122,683

Maximum

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

Hourly Pay

$13.50

Minimum

$27.25

Median

$35.50

Maximum

Annual Pay

$7,580

Minimum

$37,269

Median

$79,787

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Industrial electricians install, maintain, test, troubleshoot and repair industrial electrical equipment and associated electrical and electronic controls. They work for electrical contractors and maintenance departments of factories, plants, mines, shipyards and other industrial businesses.

Job duties

Industrial electricians:

  • Read and interpret drawings, blueprints, schematics, and electrical code specifications to determine layout of industrial electrical equipment installations.
  • Install, examine, replace, or repair electrical wiring, receptacles, switch boxes, conduits, feeders, fibre-optic and coaxial cable assemblies, lighting fixtures and other electrical components.
  • Test electrical and electronic equipment and components for continuity, current, voltage and resistance.
  • Maintain, repair, install and test switchgear, transformers, switchboard meters, regulators, and reactors.
  • Maintain, repair, test and install electrical motors, generators, alternators, industrial storage batteries and hydraulic and pneumatic electrical control systems.
  • Troubleshoot, maintain and repair industrial, electrical, and electronic control systems and other related devices.
  • Conduct preventive maintenance programs and keep maintenance records.
  • May install, maintain, and calibrate industrial instrumentation and related devices.

Sample job titles

  • industrial electrician
  • maintenance electrician - industrial
  • marine electrician
  • mine electrician
  • plant electrician
  • plant maintenance electrician
  • rig electrician
  • ship's electrician

Skills

  • This work requires good mechanical and electrical skills. You should have a strong background in mathematics and the sciences. Basic calculation and blueprint-reading skills are needed. You must also be able to follow instructions and be comfortable working with tools. Good eyesight, colour vision, and hand-eye coordination are necessary.

Job requirements

  • High school is usually required.
  • A four- or five-year industrial electrician apprenticeship program or a combination of over five years of work experience in the trade and some high school, college or industry courses in industrial electrical equipment is usually required to be eligible for trade certification.
  • Trade certification for industrial electricians is voluntary in Nova Scotia.
  • Additional construction electrician certification may be required for industrial electricians when the employers are not owners of the industrial electrical equipment.
  • Red Seal Endorsement (RSE) is also available to qualified industrial electricians upon successful completion of the interprovincial Red Seal examination.

Other considerations

  • The wage rate for apprentices is usually a percentage of the journeyperson rate, increasing upon completion of each stage of the apprenticeship program. Progression to supervisory positions is possible with experience.

By the numbers

Quick look

990

employed in 2016

96.5%

employed full-time

1.0%

self employed

4.0%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
96%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
38.8

median age

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

57,925

employed in 2016

85.9%

employed full-time

11.8%

self employed

5.3%
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94.7%
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46.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

44.7%

Halifax

$72,809 median annual income
19.3%

Cape Breton

$76,812 median annual income
14.7%

North Shore

$71,782 median annual income
10.7%

Annapolis Valley

$65,711 median annual income
10.7%

Southern

$56,829 median annual income

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

34.3%

Manufacturing

26.4%

Construction

12.9%

Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction

11.4%

Public administration

5.0%

Transportation and warehousing

What is the age of Employment?

34.0%

25-34

20.0%

45-54

19.0%

55-64

18.0%

35-44

7.0%

15-24

3.0%

65+

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

24.4%

45-54

22.1%

55-64

17.7%

35-44

17.7%

25-34

10.9%

15-24

Top levels of education

48.2%

Trade Certification

$74,504 median annual income
39.2%

College Diploma

$68,500 median annual income
7.0%

High school

$56,777 median annual income
4.0%

Bachelor

$59,558 median annual income
1.5%

Diploma Below Bachelor

N/A

Compared to: All Trades and Transportation

29.2%

Trade Certification

$46,494 median annual income
25.5%

High school

$31,260 median annual income
22.3%

College Diploma

$42,050 median annual income
18.7%

Less than high school

$28,319 median annual income
2.8%

Bachelor

$30,527 median annual income

Education & training

Electrician - Pre-apprenticeship College Program

College or Trades Program

These programs preapre students to apply technical knowledge and skills to install, operate, maintain, and repair electric apparatus and systems such as residential, commercial, and industrial electric-power wiring; and DC and AC motors, controls, and electrical distribution panels. They include courses in the principles of electronics and electrical systems, wiring, power transmission, safety, industrial and household appliances, job estimation, electrical testing and inspection, and applicable codes and standards.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

Apprenticeship Training

Halifax, NS

Building Trades Advancement College of Nova Scotia

Lakeside, NS

Electromechanical Technology/Electromechanical Engineering Technology

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of engineers engaged in developing and testing automated, servomechanical, and other electromechanical systems. They include courses in prototype testing, manufacturing and operational testing, systems analysis and maintenance procedures, and report preparation.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

High School Diploma or Equivalent

High School Program

Adults without a high school diploma can contact the Nova Scotia School for Adult Learning (NSSAL) for tuition-free programming across the province. NSSAL oversees adult education programs in Nova Scotia. NSSAL partners with the Nova Scotia Community College, Adult High Schools, Université Sainte-Anne, and community-based learning organizations to deliver programs. NSSAL offers clear, accessible pathways from adult basic education to a high school credential or GED.

Institutions providing this program

Universite Sainte-Anne

Pointe-de-l'Église, NS

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

Adult High Schools

Various, NS

Community Learning Organizations

Various, NS

Industrial Electronics Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to assemble, install, operate, maintain, and repair electrical/electronic equipment used in industry and manufacturing. They include courses in installing, maintaining and testing various types of equipment.

There are no schools in Nova Scotia offering this program.

Employment requirements & contacts

Regulations

Industrial Electrician

Certificate of Qualification (Voluntary): This is a designated trade in Nova Scotia. Employers may require certification, but a certificate is not needed to legally do this work.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
Halifax, NS
Mine Electrician (INACTIVE)

Trade Inactive: This trade is currently inactive in Nova Scotia.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
Halifax, NS

Contacts

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Canada
Various, NS
Nova Scotia Construction Sector Council
Halifax, NS

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.