Electronic Service Technicians (Household and Business Equipment)

(NOC 2242)

in All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

Electronic service technicians service and repair household and business electronic equipment like audio and video systems, computers, servers, photocopiers, printers, and other office equipment. Alarm and security technicians install and maintain electronic security alarm systems of 50V or less for homes and businesses, but this does not include fire alarm systems. They work for electronic service and retail companies, wholesale distributors, and within service departments of electronic manufacturing companies.

Job Outlook

average

Read more

  • Estimate Moderate growth employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 190 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate Moderate rate of unemployment in 2022

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

  • Estimate 3410 employment change, 2021-2023
  • Estimate 5690 openings due to growth and retirements, 2021-2023
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for these occupation.

Outlook: average, mostly balanced conditions in the labour market.

Size of the occupation: large, with job opportunities occurring regularly.

Demand: Employment growth will lead to a moderate number of new positions. Some positions become available due to employee turnover. A moderate number of positions will become available due to retirements. There are a moderate number of unemployed workers with recent experience in this occupation.

Work hours: full-time, usually. Both permanent and temporary positions are common.

Hourly Pay

$15.00

Minimum

$24.39

Median

$41.00

Maximum

Annual Pay

$9,070

Minimum

$47,583

Median

$77,336

Maximum

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

Hourly Pay

$18.00

Minimum

$34.90

Median

$54.10

Maximum

Annual Pay

$13,568

Minimum

$60,422

Median

$107,009

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Electronic service technicians service and repair household and business electronic equipment like audio and video systems, computers, servers, photocopiers, printers, and other office equipment. Alarm and security technicians install and maintain electronic security alarm systems of 50V or less for homes and businesses, but this does not include fire alarm systems. They work for electronic service and retail companies, wholesale distributors, and within service departments of electronic manufacturing companies.

Job duties

Electronic service technicians:

  • Install, maintain, and repair household and business electronic equipment like televisions, radios, video cassette recorders, stereo equipment, photocopiers, computers, and related equipment.
  • Inspect and test electronic equipment, components and assemblies using multimeters, circuit testers, oscilloscopes, logic probes and other electronic test instruments, tools, and equipment.
  • Diagnose and locate circuit, component, and equipment faults.
  • Adjust, align, replace, or repair electronic equipment, assemblies and components following equipment manuals and schematics, and using soldering tools and other hand and power tools.
  • Complete work orders, test, and maintenance reports.
  • May supervise other electronic equipment service technicians.

Sample job titles

  • alarm and security technician
  • audio-video service technician
  • computer service technician
  • electronic equipment installer and repairer
  • electronic service technician supervisor
  • household and business equipment technician
  • office equipment service technician
  • technical service representative - household and business equipment

Skills

  • Mechanical and problem-solving skills
  • Spatial perception
  • Attention to detail
  • Patience
  • Manual dexterity and motor coordination
  • Good vision to see small, delicate parts
  • Good colour perception to detect small changes in colour
  • Good hearing to trace malfunctions back to the source
  • Communication and customer service skills
  • An interest in technology and discovering how things work
  • Ability to work under pressure
  • Analytical skills
  • Organizational skills
  • Multitasking skills
  • Ability to work alone and with others
  • Enjoy using tools and equipment for precise tasks
  • Ability to work with little direction or supervision

Job requirements

  • A two-to-three-year college program in electronics or completion of high school or college courses in electronics and on-the-job training is required.
  • Trade Qualifier option, 8,100 hours, and other criteria.
  • Certification for alarm and security technicians is voluntary in Nova Scotia.
  • Write and score a minimum of 70% on the Nova Scotia Provincial Certification Exam for alarm and security technicians as a trade qualifier.

Other considerations

  • Office equipment technicians work in office settings and are expected to wear business clothes. They may need to travel from one service call to another and do some heavy lifting. Few hazards, but work can be stressful if customers are impatient.
  • Office equipment technicians work standard office hours. Some technicians must be on call for after-hours emergency repairs. Some jobs require out-of-town travel.
  • Experienced office equipment technicians may advance to supervisory, management, or training positions. Some open independent repair shops of their own.
  • Computer service technicians work in a variety of settings. Some can be clean and airy, while others might be cold and dusty. They may need to lift and carry computer components.
  • Computer service technicians usually work a standard workweek. Some may be on 24-hour call for certain periods. Overtime may be required if systems fail. The work can be stressful when systems fail.
  • Experienced computer service technicians may become supervisors or managers. Those with further training can become technical specialists – helping engineers design equipment.
  • Security alarm installers work in both indoor and outdoor settings. These may vary from clean, comfortable homes and businesses to cold, dusty buildings under construction. Travel between job sites is required.
  • Security alarm installers usually work a 40-hour workweek. Overtime may be required during busy periods. For customer convenience, installers may work some evenings and weekends.
  • Risks for security alarm installers include risks associated with working with power tools and electricity. They may need to work on ladders, scaffolding, and man lifts. The work involves handling heavier items. Personal protective equipment (PPE) is required when working on construction sites.
  • A growing number of security alarm installers work on a contract basis.
  • Security alarm installers do not install fire alarm systems.
  • Experienced security alarm installers may advance to lead installer and supervisor positions. They move to other areas like sales or customer service or open their own business.

By the numbers

Quick look

1,435

employed in 2016

87.8%

employed full-time

10.1%

self employed

7.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
92.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
44.9

median age

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

25,875

employed in 2016

91.5%

employed full-time

7.6%

self employed

20.0%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
80%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
42.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

53.7%

Halifax

$49,344 median annual income
13.9%

Annapolis Valley

$50,513 median annual income
12.5%

North Shore

$48,121 median annual income
11.1%

Southern

$29,453 median annual income
8.7%

Cape Breton

$39,006 median annual income

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

North Shore

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

12.3%

Wholesale trade

12.3%

Professional, scientific and technical services

12.3%

Construction

10.3%

Retail trade

9.9%

Administrative and support, waste management and remediation services

What is the age of Employment?

26.0%

45-54

23.0%

35-44

19.0%

25-34

19.0%

55-64

8.0%

15-24

5.0%

65+

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

24.2%

25-34

23.5%

45-54

23.4%

35-44

16.4%

55-64

7.7%

15-24

Top levels of education

51.2%

College Diploma

$49,566 median annual income
17.1%

High school

$45,835 median annual income
16.0%

Trade Certification

$51,731 median annual income
8.0%

Bachelor

$38,852 median annual income
3.8%

Less than high school

$26,493 median annual income

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

33.1%

College Diploma

$59,986 median annual income
29.8%

Bachelor

$63,965 median annual income
11.9%

High school

$45,835 median annual income
9.9%

Master

$65,105 median annual income
6.9%

Trade Certification

$57,773 median annual income

Education & training

Computer Installation and Repair Technology/Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to assemble, install, operate, maintain, and repair computers and related equipment. They include courses in power supplies, number systems, memory structure, buffers and registers, microprocessor design, peripheral equipment, programming, and networking.

Institutions providing this program

Academy of Learning Career College - Halifax

Halifax, NS

Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of electrical, electronics and communication engineers. They include courses in electrical circuitry, prototype development and testing; systems analysis and testing, systems maintenance, instrument calibration, and report preparation.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Community College

Various, NS

Electrical/Electronics Equipment Installation and Repair

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to operate, maintain, and repair electrical and electronic equipment. They include courses in electrical circuitry, simple gearing, linkages and lubrication of machines and appliances, and the use of testing equipment.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency

Halifax, NS

Industrial Electronics Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to assemble, install, operate, maintain, and repair electrical/electronic equipment used in industry and manufacturing. They include courses in installing, maintaining and testing various types of equipment.

There are no schools in Nova Scotia offering this program.

Security System Installation, Repair and Inspection Technician

College or Trades Program

These programs prepare students to apply technical knowledge and skills to install and repair household, business, and industrial security alarms, sensors, video and sound recording devices, identification systems, protective barriers, and related technologies.

Institutions providing this program

Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency

Halifax, NS

Employment requirements & contacts

Regulations

Alarm and Security Technician

Certificate of Qualification (Voluntary): This is a designated trade in Nova Scotia. Employers may require certification, but a certificate is not needed to legally work in this trade.

Regulating body:
Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency
Halifax, NS

Contacts

TechNova
Dartmouth, NS

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.