Geological and Minerals Technologists and Technicians

(NOC 2212)

in All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

Geological and mineral technologists and technicians provide technical support and services or may work independently in the fields of oil and gas exploration and production, geophysics, petroleum engineering, geology, mining and mining engineering, mineralogy, extractive and physical metallurgy, metallurgical engineering and environmental protection. Geological technologists conduct or direct geochemical, hydrographic, or oceanographic surveys; exploratory drilling; well logging; or underground mine survey programs. They are employed by petroleum and mining companies, consulting geology and engineering firms, and by governments and educational institutions as well as by a variety of manufacturing, construction and utilities companies.

Job Outlook

Undetermined

Read more

  • Estimate change in employment not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate openings due to growth and retirements not available for this occupation.
  • Estimate rate of unemployment not available for this occupation.

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

  • Estimate Strong growth employment change, 2017-2019
  • Estimate 3095 openings due to growth and retirements, 2017-2019
  • Estimate Low rate of unemployment in 2016

This is not a large occupation in Nova Scotia so job opportunities may not be that frequent. With a large percent of workers being 55 years of age and older, retirements are expected to be a key contributor to employment opportunities over the coming years. Geological and Minerals Technologists and Technicians most commonly work full-time hours. Furthermore, the jobs may either be permanent or temporary positions, as both are common. Also, a fair portion of the workforce is self-employed, so having the option to "work for yourself" may appeal to some individuals’ interests/motivations.

The median employment income for 55% of Geological and Minerals Technologists and Technicians who worked full-time, year-round in 2015 was $69,330. Across all occupations in Nova Scotia, 59% of those who worked full-time year round had a median employment income of $43,600.
(Source: 2016 Census)

Hourly Pay

$14.00

Minimum

$23.08

Median

$57.69

Maximum

Annual Pay

N/A

Minimum

$64,627

Median

N/A

Maximum

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

Hourly Pay

$17.69

Minimum

$31.35

Median

$47.18

Maximum

Annual Pay

$13,568

Minimum

$60,422

Median

$107,009

Maximum

About the job

Nature of work

Geological and mineral technologists and technicians provide technical support and services or may work independently in the fields of oil and gas exploration and production, geophysics, petroleum engineering, geology, mining and mining engineering, mineralogy, extractive and physical metallurgy, metallurgical engineering and environmental protection. Geological technologists conduct or direct geochemical, hydrographic, or oceanographic surveys; exploratory drilling; well logging; or underground mine survey programs. They are employed by petroleum and mining companies, consulting geology and engineering firms, and by governments and educational institutions as well as by a variety of manufacturing, construction and utilities companies.

Job duties

Geological and mineral technologists perform some or all of the following duties:

  • Conduct or direct geological, geophysical, geochemical, hydrographic or oceanographic surveys, prospecting field trips, exploratory drilling, well logging or underground mine survey programs.
  • Configure, operate and maintain geophysical survey and well logging instruments and equipment.
  • Prepare notes, sketches, geological maps and cross sections.
  • Prepare, transcribe or analyze seismic, gravimetric, well log or other geophysical and survey data.
  • Assist engineers and geologists in the evaluation and analysis of petroleum and mineral reservoirs.
  • Prepare or supervise the preparation of rock, mineral or metal samples and perform physical and chemical laboratory tests.
  • Conduct or assist in environmental audits, in the design of measures to minimize undesirable environmental effects of new or expanded mining and oil and gas operations, and in the development of waste management and other related environmental protection procedures.
  • May supervise oil and gas well drilling, well completions and work-overs.
  • May conduct or supervise studies and programs related to mine development, mining methods, mine ventilation, lighting, drainage, and ground control.
  • May assist engineers and metallurgists in specifying material selection, metal treatments or corrosion protection systems.
  • May assist hydrogeologists in evaluating groundwater and well circulation and in report preparation.
  • May develop specifications for heat treatment of metals or for welding, design welding fixtures, troubleshoot welding processes or quality problems and supervise welding projects.
  • May coordinate crew members' activities during seismic tests.

Geological and mineral technicians perform some or all of the following duties:

  • Participate in geological, geophysical, geochemical, hydrographic or oceanographic surveys, prospecting field trips, exploratory drilling, well logging or underground mine survey programs and in environmental audits and related environmental protection activities.
  • Operate and maintain geophysical survey and well logging instruments and equipment.
  • Prepare notes, sketches, geological maps and cross sections.
  • Assist in preparing, transcribing or analyzing seismic, gravimetric, well log or other geophysical and survey data.
  • Assist in the preparation of rock, mineral or metal samples and in conducting physical and chemical laboratory tests.
  • Assist in hydrogeological field and laboratory studies and in preparation of reports.
  • Carry out a limited range of other technical functions in support of geology, geophysics and petroleum and mining engineering.

Sample job titles

  • geological engineering technician
  • geophysical technologist
  • groundwater technologist
  • hydrological technician
  • marine geoscience technologist
  • metallurgical technologist
  • mineral technician
  • oil geology technologist
  • seismic technician
  • welding technologist

Skills

The skills and aptitudes for these jobs are as varied as the entrance requirements. You should be interested in science and technology and be able to work with detailed processes, machines, and techniques. Familiarity with computers is necessary for some positions. An aptitude for mathematics and the sciences at the high school level is important. Some of these jobs involve exposure to heat, noise, vibration, fumes, and dust, while other jobs are in a relatively clean laboratory environment.

Job requirements

  • Geological and mineral technologists usually require completion of a two- to three-year college program in geological technology, petroleum technology, petroleum engineering technology, hydrogeology or groundwater technology, mining technology, mining engineering technology, mineralogy, metallurgical technology, or welding technology.
  • Geophysics technologists usually require completion of a two- to three-year college program in electronics technology.
  • Geological and mineral technicians usually require completion of a one- to two-year college program in a related field.
  • Certification in geological and mineral technology or in a related field is available through provincial associations of engineering/applied science technologists and technicians and may be required by employers.
  • A period of supervised work experience, usually two years, is required before certification.

Other considerations

None

By the numbers

Quick look

100

employed in 2016

96.6%

employed full-time

10.0%

self employed

6.3%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
93.7%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
42.5

median age

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

25,875

employed in 2016

93.6%

employed full-time

6.9%

self employed

20.0%
Icons/female Created with Sketch.
80%
Icons/male Created with Sketch.
42.8

median age

Where will I likely work?

50.0%

Halifax

21.9%

Cape Breton

12.5%

Northern

9.4%

Southern

9.4%

Annapolis Valley

Compared to: All NS Occupations

47.0%

Halifax

15.6%

Northern

12.9%

Annapolis Valley

12.7%

Cape Breton

11.8%

Southern

Top Industries of Employment

29.2%

Professional Business Services

16.7%

Support for Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction

12.5%

Mining (except O/G)

8.3%

Food and Beverage Product Manufacturing

8.3%

Oil and Gas Extraction

What is the age of Employment?

26.3%

25-34

25.3%

35-44

23.2%

15-24

15.8%

45-54

7.4%

55-64

3.2%

65+

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

32.5%

35-44

32.0%

45-54

18.0%

55-64

13.5%

25-34

3.5%

65+

Top levels of education

31.0%

Bachelor's degree

$46,350 median annual income
27.6%

High school

$26,315 median annual income
17.2%

College certificate or diploma

$46,413 median annual income
10.3%

Trades certificate

N/A
6.9%

University certificate or diploma

$33,873 median annual income

Compared to: All Engineering, Math, Science, and Information Technology

33.7%

College certificate or diploma

$52,476 median annual income
29.7%

Bachelor's degree

$58,011 median annual income
12.1%

High school

$35,125 median annual income
9.7%

Master's degree

$37,706 median annual income
6.8%

Trades certificate

$54,923 median annual income

Education & training

Hydrology and water resources science

This program is typically offered at the college or university level.

This instructional program class comprises any program that focuses on the scientific of study of the occurrence, circulation, distribution, chemical and physical properties, and environmental interaction of surface and subsurface waters, including groundwater. These programs include courses in geophysics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, chemical physics, geomorphology, mathematical modelling, hydrologic analysis, continental water processes, global water balance, and environmental science.

There are no schools in Nova Scotia offering this program.

Mining technology/technician

This program is typically offered at the trades/college level.

This instructional program class comprises any program that prepares individuals to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of engineers and other professionals engaged in the development and operation of mines and related mineral processing facilities. These programs include courses in principles of mineral extraction and related geology, mineral field mapping and site analysis, testing and sampling methods, instrument calibration, assay analysis, test equipment operation and maintenance, mine environment and safety monitoring procedures, mine inspection procedures, and report preparation.

Institutions providing this program

Apprenticeship Training

Department of Labour and Advanced Education 2021 Brunswick Street, PO Box 578

Halifax, NS B3J 2S9

(800) 494-5651

Petroleum engineering

This program is typically offered at the university level.

This instructional program class comprises any program that prepares individuals to apply mathematical and scientific principles to the design, development and operational evaluation of systems for locating, extracting, processing and refining crude petroleum and natural gas, including prospecting instruments and equipment, mining and drilling systems, processing and refining systems and facilities, storage facilities, transportation systems, and related environmental and safety systems.

Institutions providing this program

Dalhousie University

Office of the Registrar

Halifax, NS B3H 4R2

(902) 494-2450

Cape Breton University

PO Box 5300 1250 Grand Lake Road

Sydney, NS B1P 6L2

(888) 959-9995

Petroleum technology/technician

This program is typically offered at the trades/college level.

This instructional program class comprises any program that prepares individuals to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills in support of engineers and other professionals engaged in the development and operation of oil and natural gas extraction and processing facilities. These programs include courses in principles of petroleum extraction and related geology, petroleum field mapping and site analysis, testing and sampling methods, instrument calibration, laboratory analysis, test equipment operation and maintenance, environment and safety monitoring procedures for oil/gas fields and facilities, facility inspection procedures, and report preparation.

Institutions providing this program

Cape Breton University

PO Box 5300 1250 Grand Lake Road

Sydney, NS B1P 6L2

(888) 959-9995

Employment requirements & contacts

No regulating bodies were found under this occupation profile

Contacts

Chemical Institute of Canada
222 Queen Street, Suite 400
Ottawa, ON K1P 5V9
Tel: (613) 232-6252
Fax: (613) 232-5862
Canadian Council of Technicians and Technologists
2197 Riverside Dr., Suite 405
Ottawa, ON K1H 7X3
Tel: (613) 238-8123
Fax: (613) 238-8822

Additional resources

There are no additional resources for this occupation.

Job postings

There are currently no job postings for this occupation.