Industry Trends

Employment and Jobs 2022

Compared to 2021 the province had an overall increase in employment of 3.6% or 16,900 jobs in 2022. Full-time jobs rose by 5.5% (21,300). However, part-time jobs went down for -5% (-4,500).

  • The service sector gained 21,300 jobs (3.6%) by adding 16,200 (5.5%) full-time jobs and on the other hand, by losing 4,700 (-6%) part-time jobs.
  • The goods producing sector gained 5,300 jobs (5.8%) by adding 5,100 (6%) full-time jobs and 200 (3.3%) jobs in part-time sector.

Nova Scotia’s service-producing sector accounted for 80.2% of provincial employment in 2022. Professional, scientific and technical services accounted for the biggest net job gains with 4,700 new jobs (+14.3%). Information, culture and recreation come in second with 2,700 added jobs (20%). The biggest net loses occurred in transportation and warehousing with a net loss of 3,900 jobs (-16%).

Nova Scotia’s goods-producing sector accounted for 19.8% of provincial employment in 2022. Construction industry led with 6,500 jobs (+18.2%), followed by manufacturing that had net increase of 1,700 jobs (+5.2%). The biggest net loses were in forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas with 1,300 lost jobs (-11.8%). This was followed by agriculture with a net loss of 1,000 jobs (-16.4%).

Unemployment 2022

Historically, unemployment has been higher in the goods-producing sector than in the services-producing sector even though the gap has narrowed in recent years.

  • In 2022 unemployment in the goods-producing sector was 7.1% (down from 8.3% in 2021) - a record low dating back to the establishment of the modern Labour Force Survey in 1976.
  • Unemployment in the services-producing sector stood at 3.8% (down from 4.6% in 2021).

A table titled Labour Force Characteristics. Column headings are Industry Group, x1,000; Employment in 2020, 2021, 2022; Jobs; % Change 2021-2022; and unemployment rate 2022. Rows are NAICS industry at the 2-digit level and grouped according to goods producing sector and services sector. The sectors are highlighted in blue.

Data in the graphs below is indexed to the year 2012 to show trends and to compare with the Canadian economy.

Goods-Producing Sector Trends

  • From 2012 to 2017, a widening gap appeared in employment growth in the goods-producing sector between Nova Scotia and Canada.
  • From 2013 to 2017 the growth in goods-sector employment was essentially flat in Canada but dropped by a total of 8% in Nova Scotia. The resulting gap narrowed between 2017 and 2020, before being nearly eliminated in 2021.
  • In 2020, employment in the goods-producing sector contracted by only 1.3% in Nova Scotia versus a 4.7% drop nationally.
  • In 2021, employment in the sector grew by 5.2% in Nova Scotia, while the national increase was 3.3%.
  • Following 2021, in 2022 employment in goods-producing sector grew by 5.8% in Nova Scotia and 3.8% in Canada.

A trend chart titled “Indexed Goods-Sector Employment, 2012-2022, Canada and Nova Scotia, base year 2012=100”. The vertical axis runs in intervals of 5 from 85 at the bottom to 110 at the top. The horizontal axis shows each year from 2012 to 2022. A dark blue line represents Canada’s employment trend. A light blue line represents Nova Scotia’s employment trend.

Service-Producing Sector Trends

Employment in the services-producing sector expanded in Canada throughout the 2012 to 2019 period, with a dip in 2020. In Nova Scotia, the sector struggled from 2012 to 2015, as the employment level dropped by 2.9% in those years before rebounding from 2016 to 2019.

The impact of COVID-19 in 2020 led to decreases in employment in this sector both in Nova Scotia (-5.4%) and Canada (-5.2%). In 2021, employment recovered in the service-producing sector, increasing by 5.7% in Nova Scotia and 5.4% nationally. Compared to 2021, in 2022 employment in the service-producing sector grew 3.9% in Canada and 3.1% in Nova Scotia.

Employment in the service-producing sector in 2022 is 15.0% higher than 2012 levels nationally, and 6.0% higher in Nova Scotia.

A trend chart titled “Indexed Service Producing Sector Employment, 2012-2022, Canada and Nova Scotia, base year 2012=100”. The vertical axis runs in intervals of 5 from 90 at the bottom to 120 at the top. The horizontal axis shows each year from 2012 to 2022. A dark blue line represents Canada’s employment trend. A light blue line represents Nova Scotia’s employment trend.

 

If you have questions please contact AskLMI@novascotia.ca.